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 #2297978


Rexxaroo
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 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

Hello fellow dragon tamers!
I’ve seen alot of new faces around here, so I thought I may as well designate a care post instead of having to copy and paste a thousand times!
So, here we go everyone!

Full Guide to Care and Husbandry of Water Dragons

by Casey Strohschein

To start to care for a water dragon, it is important to understand where they come from. Asian water dragons, (also known as Chinese, green, or common water dragons) are found naturally in Vietnam and Thailand off of eastern Asia.
Australian water dragons, and Gippsland water dragons both come from central and coastal areas of Australia.

The Asian water dragons environment is a humid, rainforest that overlooks rivers and lakes. They reside in tree tops and canopies where they can safely drop into rivers to swim away if danger is present. They can swim quickly, and hold their breath for up to 90 minutes.
Natural predators of the lizard are snakes, large mammals, birds of prey, large crocodiles, and of course man himself.

ENCLOSURE:
Simulating your dragons habitat best in captivity, it is important to provide lots of room to climb.
To start, a young dragon can be kept happily in a 55-75 gallon tank for the first months of its life. They grow quickly, and need to eat a lot at that age.
As they reach about 16-19 inches, you should move them to their permanent enclosure, that should be no smaller than 36x24x48 (LxWxH)
Some owners will start their dragon in its permanganate enclosure, but it is entirely up to your own personal preference.
It is also important to add that vents should be used in the enclosure for proper ventilation.
Generally, two near the bottom on the back or sides of the enclosure and two near the top on the sides is best placement.
If you do add vents directly to the top of your cage, you will lose a lot more heat and humidity that can otherwise be avoided.

If you wish to build your own cage out of wood, note that you MUST seal with a polyurethane type sealer. I recommend water based polyurethane such as Minwax, and apply two to three coats to any area that will come into contact with humidity.
It is best not to use pressed wood, pine, or cedar as these are toxic.
You should thoroughly seal the inside and outside of the enclosure as well if you plan on using these types of woods. (at least three to four coats of sealant)
Be careful not to use ANY wood substrate or branches that contain these types of woods as well. The fumes are toxic and WILL kill your dragon.


***A note on keeping dragons in glass enclosures: Water dragons are very prone to what is known as snout rub. They do not understand the concept of glass and will repeatedly bash their faces against the glass in an attempt to get past this barrier. To prevent this, you should cover all sides except for the viewing side, and the viewing side should be covered about 1/3 of the way. This should be kept for most of their life, as they do not grow out of it.
Treating a damaged snout: Use a betadine/water solution and gently apply it with a cotton swab. The solution should be about 13betadine, 2/3 water. You can also apply triple antibiotic cream, such as neosporin to the are, but be sure to use the kind WITHOUT painkillers.**

To set up the enclosure, be sure to provide many things for it to climb on. Branches, logs, vines, etc can be set up vertically, horizontally, and at many angles. This allows basking spots to become variable and also offers stimulation in providing the dragon with exerciser and safety.
It is also important o have your enclosure up and running at least a day or two before you acquire the dragon to make sure temps and humidity are in order.

**A note on decor: Branches can be bought or acquired from outdoors. Be sure not to use ANY pine or cedar. These are, as stated earlier, Toxic.
Branches collected from outside can be cleaned two ways:
-For small branches and vines, strip bark from the limb and rinse thoroughly with water.
Place in the oven for 15-20 minutes at 450 degrees and allow to cool.
It is now sterile and safe to use.
-For large branches: Strip bark from limbs, and rinse thoroughly with a bleach and water solution. Allow to dry and rinse thoroughly a few times in water.
Allow to sun dry or air dry for one to two days, depending on your location.
It is now sterile and safe to use. You may also seal the larger limbs or smaller limbs with minwax as well, which helps to prevent mold growth and also deterioration of the wood.

WATER:
Now, hence the name, these animals need a large dish of water to swim in. They will defecate in their bowl, so it is important to keep it very clean. If you do not have filtration set up in your dish, you MUST change the water every day. With filtration, you will still need to change it once a week minimum.
Water should also be conditioned to remove any heavy metals from the water. You can use any aquarium water conditioner that can be sound easily in any pet store.
You can add live fish such as minnows, goldfish, guppies, and danios to your pond, as well as live water plants for a natural feel.

SUBSTRATE:
Young dragons should be kept on a SOLID substrate, such as tile, repticarpet, dishtowels, etc.
Loose substrate can cause impaction which can lead to death ultimately. Impaction is caused by the ingestion of a material (such as sand or soil). It cannot be digested, and forms a blockage in the intestines causing the dragon to become septic form being unable to pass its waste and it will perish.
Dragons love to “taste” everything, it is how they check their surrounds. Young dragons will lick everything hence they are more prone to becoming impacted.
After your dragon has reached about 2 years or more, it is safe to place them on a loose substrate.
Proper substrates are:
-Pure cypress mulch (NEVER cedar or pine, these are toxic to reptiles)
-A mixture of clean topsoil, sifted paver’s sand, and peat moss (about a 1/3 of each)
-A mixture of peat moss and cypress mulch or topsoil (½ of each, or 1/3 of each of you want to use all three)
-Mix of eco earth, peat moss or topsoil. Any of these is fine, as long as it is a mixture and not just one substrate alone.

**NEVER use SAND or GRAVEL alone as substrate. No matter what stage your dragon is at, it IS dangerous and WILL lead to death.**


LIGHTING:
These lizards are DIURNAL, meaning they are active during the day. Lighting will play an very important role in this
These animals need plenty of heat, with basking area surface temps from 100-90 , overall ambient temps of 90-88 and cool areas of 85-78. At night, you may or may not need to provide heat depending on your area or where the cage is positioned. Night time temps can from from 75-70, but no lower than 65.
You can use an under tank heater, or Uth to provide heat, or a Ceramic Heat emitter. Stay away from red or black “nighttime” bulbs as they disrupt the sleep schedule.

UVB lighting MUST be provided, as it will take place of natural sunlight in captivity. In the wild, they get far more UV than an they do in captivity so it is recommended that you take your dragon outside from time to time to get some natural rays, providing that your locations allows. UV rays help the animal to produce calcium as they cannot produce their own. This is vital to their well being, and promotes healthy skin, teeth, and bones.
It is best to use a Tube fluorescent bulb that has 10.0 output or higher. These lights can get hot, and like any bulb, may burn your animal. Be sure to place these types of lights at least6 inches away from your animals basking spot.

**Stay away from any light sold as a “COMPACT FLOURESCENT BULB” or, “coil bulbs”
These have been linked to many issues in reptile eyesight and overall health. They will cause issues in your animal that could lead to fatality.**

Another source of UVB lighting, can be found in Mercury Vapor bulbs, commonly known as MVBs.
These put out not only UVB, but UVA and heat as well. They are slightly more expensive than your average bulb, ranging from 35-60 dollars or more. Well worth the price as they are long lasting, having a bulb life for about 1-2 years.
These get very hot and put out high amounts of UVB, so they should be at a MINIMUM of 12 inches away from any given basking area.

Heat itself can be provided with a 75 watt or higher heat bulb.
I use a combination of one 18 inch 10.0 fluorescent reptisun tube, one 100w MVB, and one 75w reptisun heat bulb.
I do not provide nighttime heat, as I live in a warm climate where it drops to 65 degrees max in my home. My lights are also on a timer, so I do not need to worry about turning lights on and off. You can buy timers from any hardware store, home depot, lowes, or even off the internet.

***PLEASE NOTE!!! Without proper UVB lighting, water dragons can develop what is known as metabolic bone disorder, or MBD. This causes the bones in their body to become brittle, the spine to curve, and deform the jaws and limbs. Overall, it is a terrible disease that can be easily prevented by providing proper lighting, heat, and supplementation with food.***

HUMIDITY:
Humidity is also very important to these animals, and should be kept at 60-100 percent at any given time. Generally, my enclosure stays around 75%-80% and will be higher or lower depending on misting.
Some ways to encourage humidity:
-Live plants within the enclosure
-Placing the water dish underneath a heat bulb
-Moving water
-Misting
-A humidifier or fogging system within the enclosure
-Damp substrate (after the dragon is a year or two old)
-Sphagnum or Spanish moss that is damp, spread throughout the cage.

I myself, keep live plants in the cage at all times as it makes the enclosure humid, and also gives it a natural feel. I also use an Exoterra Ultrasonic foggier that is set on a timer. If you do not put your fogger on a timer, mold growth can occur which can make your dragon sick.
I also spray my enclosure two to three times daily for added moisture.

***A note on ultrasonic foggers**
Ultrasonic foggers emit a stream that can harm your animal. If you wish to put one of these in your enclosure, I suggest a housing unit. I use a dragon head sculpture that I purchased st the store for a few dollars. It is used for aquariums, so I just placed the fogger inside the dragons head, where it allows the stream to hit the inside of the dragons mouth and allows the fog to roll nicely through the water dish without causing harm. You will also need to replace the ceramic disk on the fogger once a year or so, to keep it running properly. You should also take time once every other month to gently clean the fogger itself by brushing any possible residue.***

BEHAVIOR BETWEEN GENDERS:
Water dragons are solitary creatures, but can be kept in pairs or trios. It is wise to house Two or three females together, or one male and one or two females.
Males housed together are very territorial and WILL kill one another.
Females require special care, and will need to be separated from males at least 6 out of 12 months out of the year.
One male and one female housed together will cause the female to become over bred, stressed, and eventually she will die.

Females must be given many calcium supplements along with their regular food regimen as well as provided with lots of UVB lighting. They also require a “lay box”.
Female dragons use their own calcium to produce eggs, therefore they need higher doses of calcium, and WILL produce eggs even if they have never bred with a male.
A lay box consists of a kitty litter tray with a mixture of damp peat moss/ soil. It should be around 7 inches deep at the least. The substrate should be easy to form a ball with , but should be easy to crush.

TAMING AND SOCIALIZATION:
Generally, after acquiring your dragon, you should allow 3days- two weeks for the animal to acclimate to its new homes. During this time, only come into contact with the animal when offering food, cleaning the cage/ water dish, or turning lights on and off.

**You should place the enclosure itself in a low traffic area of the house, so as not to stress your animal as well.**

After allowing your dragon to acclimate, you can begin to socialize it.
Some things to remember when beginning to socialize:

-Try not to approach your dragon from above, or grab it from above. This makes you seem like a large bird of prey or a hungry predator “swooping” in with scary large hands.
-Approach your dragon from the front where it can see your hand, and move slowly underneath its belly, supporting its full body so it does not feel like it will fall.
-Move slowly around your dragon and talk in a low soothing voice, and smile a lot.
-Use its name.
-Never ever hold your dragon on its back, they cannot breathe that way and will die within minutes.
-DONT RUSH THE PROCESS. It will never learn to trust you if you pull it out of the cage right away. -Time and patience is key.

To start, try hand feeding with forceps, tweezers, or just with your fingers. Just offer meal worms or crix in the palm of your hand and see if he/ or she will take it. This is a GREAT way to build trust and will make the whole process much quicker. Just leave your hand in the cage and allow it to realize what a hand means.
After trying this for a few days, when it seems comfortable, approach it from the front, sliding your fingers along the belly and chest and hold it inside the cage. Try lifting up just a few inches so it understands what that means when you place your hand there. Eventually, it will allow you to pick it up no problem.
When you have passed this stage and earned your dragons trust, you can begin to let it free roam.
Be sure to dragon proof a room, make sure anything that is able to be swallowed is put away so your dragon cannot eat it.
As far as that goes, that is all there is to it. They are very docile, and very easy to tame. They make wonderful lap lizards and have great temperament.

FEEDING:
Dragons are omnivorous. They will eat just about anything, including insects, fruits, vegetables, and whole prey items. Dragons at different stages of maturity get fed differently, so it is important to offer different kinds of food at different stages in their life.
A hatchling or juvenile needs to be fed daily; an adult- gets fed about every 2 to 3 days, although many people like myself do feed their adult dragons on a daily basis. Feed smaller portions if you would like to feed an adult dragon on a daily basis to prevent them from becoming overweight. Be sure to offer plenty of different items as dragons will get bored with the same food.
However, whatever size the dragon is disregard this feeding schedule if the dragon is skinny as you need to get some weight on this little guy!If your dragon is underweight or recovering from an illness (and interested in eating) feed every day, offering food 2 or three times a day. Your dragon may only eat a bit in one sitting but be hungry later, and if you don’t offer more food your dragon will take longer to get back in shape!
**Be sure to feed items smaller or as large as the space between their eyes, but no larger! They may choke otherwise. Cut items down to size if they are too large. Earthworms can be cut in half as well.** *It is also important to remember not to feed animals from outside, as they may have parasites, or may have come into contact with pesticides.
Toxic bugs include wasps, spiders, bees, lightning bugs, and lady bugs.**

SUPPLEMENTS:
Insects and earthworms should be gut loaded, and with approximately every second day, dusted with vitamins once a week. It couldn’t hurt to add some supplementation to the fruit and veggies if the dragon is eating them.
A calcium powder with D3 should be offered 2x weekly, and calcium powder without d3 should be offered 2x weekly as well. Multivitamins offered on the other two days, and one day should be without supplements.
My Supplement schedule goes like this:
-Monday: No D3
-Tuesday: D3
-Wednesday: Multivitamins
-Thursday: No D3
-Friday: D3
-Saturday: Multivitamins
-Sunday: No supplements


**Dragons receiving diets lower in whole prey food items should of course be getting more calcium supplementation than dragons getting higher quantities of whole prey**
INSECTS:
Insects are fairly high in phosphorus and low in calcium, but do have nutritious value if not fed in abundance or as the soul diet. Most insects also have a hard indigestible exoskeleton that could cause a bowel impaction if fed in large quantities. All insects should be gut loaded with well balanced offerings of veggies and perhaps even some calcium and vitamins before being offered to your animal, as well as being dusted with calcium, or multivitamins.

Insects that are fairly easy to purchase:
-Crickets: High in phosphorous, have a chitinous shell, feed only up to 15 a day. (Also try switching meal worms one day, crickets the next.)
-Meal worms (tenibrio): Have a chitinous shell as well, offer with crickets, and be
-Super worms: tenibrio meal worms on steroids- I don’t recommend these be ed often.) -King meal worms (zophobas)
-Wax worms: Very high in fat and very low in calcium- use only as a treat!
-Earthworms, Night crawlers, and Red worms (red wigglers): Very high in protein and calcium, overall very nutritious for your lizard. Good staple food.
-Silkworms: High in Calcium
-Phoenix worms: High in calcium
-Butter worms: High in calcium, but also fatty, feed as supplement and as a treat.
-Roaches: Nutritional for your lizard, not too high in phosphorous and have plenty of protein overall.
-Locusts and Grasshoppers: Also high in protein, very good for your animal.

**Insects that can occasionally be found locally or may be purchased by mail order: butter worms, grasshoppers, locusts, dubai and lobster roaches, cicadas, and silkworms.**

WHOLE PREY FOOD ITEMS:
A selection of whole prey food items would range from pinkie, fuzzies, and adult mice, rat pups, some people have offered young chicks and feeder fish such as minnows. Some people also offer small lizards such as anoles to their dragons as a food source. Most people feed these mice and other whole prey food items dead to their dragons, but if you are buying them live, then they must be eaten within 24 hours or else they will die anyway. Plus, when you buy frozen you can buy in bulk! (thaw before feeding to your dragon! But do not put it in a microwave, just thaw it by placing it in a glass of hot water for about 5 minutes) If you have a large adult dragon you may even feed it adult mice. It is better to feed frozen, as live prey can fight back and HARM your dragon. Overall, frozen is just better.

Other whole prey food items you can offer include:
-Snails, shrimp, crayfish, and crab.

FRUIT AND VEGGIES:
If your dragon will eat veggies this should make up about 10% to 15% of their diet, but many dragons will not take fruit and veggies at all! Keepers that have success with this find fruit is preferred. Unfortunately fruit tends to be very high in phosphorus and very low in many other nutrients with the largest benefit being additional fluids and vitamins.
Fruit that have good calcium content include figs, raspberries, cantaloupe, strawberries and blueberries, mango and papayas are okay as treats. Finley chop fruits and veggies together and offer them mixed with meal worms and crickets and you will find that they will eventually come to like them.
  Veggies that have an adequate calcium to phosphorus ratio: Greens such as collards, dandelion (flowers edible too), and mustard greens. (Kale, spinach and other greens of this variety are high in oxalate which bind to calcium making it unusable) leafy veggies of the lettuce family have almost no nutrients thus are very low in value other than for their water content. Yellow squash, sweet potato, parsnips, green beans, and occasionally carrots. Veggies such as broccoli contain oxalates and as stated above that binds to calcium rendering it unusable.
**Please NOTE that all of the well balanced fruit and veggies listed above can be used when gut loading your insects!**

HOW MUCH TO FEED:

-Insects 40% - 50
-Earthworms 10% - 20%
-Whole Prey 40% - 20%
-Fruit & Veggies 10%
(If possible, otherwise increase % of whole prey)

You should offer food throughout the day, as they may not be hungry at one time, but hungry at another.
Live food should NOT be allowed to run loose in the enclosure, and when offered, should be fed either by hand, outside the enclosure, or in a bowl where they cannot escape.
Live food allowed to roam the enclosure will nibble on your dragon at night, and can even eat the eyes out of its skull.
A small ceramic dog dish is great to offer food in, as it is tall enough for the insects not to be able to crawl out of, and also slippery so they can not climb up the sides.

BREEDING BUGS:
http://www.triciaswaterdragon.com/crickets.htm

This website will provide all you need to care and breed for crickets, meal worms, and waxworms.

**If you have a STUBBORN Dragon**

Some dragons are partial to one type of food.
In this situation, we as keepers have a few options:

- Stop offering that food item and and only offer other items. Your dragon may not like that, and will refuse to eat but eventually they will get hungry and will take what you are giving.

-Do not offer food for 1-2 days, then offer the new food item. They will be hungrier and will be more accepting to the would-be food item.

-Sneak it in with their other foods

-If your dragon readily accepts anything hand fed, offer it that way! My lizards know that when it is feeding time, the feeding tongs or items in my hand, associate with yummies.

Don’t worry, every dragon goes through this rebel stage, it will pass :) You just have to show them that you are more stubborn! They will get the picture soon, and then you’ll have them eating all kinds of things!


SOME WORDS ABOUT MY EXPERIENCE:
Overall, water dragons are an extremely rewarding reptile to keep. They are beautiful and full of personality. By far they are my favorite animal to keep in captivity. When cared for properly they can live upwards of 15 years, but the oldest captive dragon on record was 24. They are relatively hardy animals, and offer a learning experience for just about any reptile owner, new and old. I hope you learn to respect and adore these creatures as much as I have. This care sheet offers a lot of information and provides you with everything you need to care for your animal.

Good luck!

Casey a.k.a

Rexx



05/30/13  10:44pm

 #2297985


Serinamarie89
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  Message To: Rexxaroo   In reference to Message Id: 2297978


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

There is so much here to "digest" ;) How old do you recommend starting to feed whole prey?



05/30/13  11:00pm

 #2297987


Rexxaroo
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  Message To: Serinamarie89   In reference to Message Id: 2297985


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

Thank you Serin! The demand for a new, up to date care sheet was in high demand, so I decided it was high time to write one!

I recommend feeding whole prey items once they are between ~8 months to 1 year old.
If you think your dragon can handle it, go to your local pet store and ask for the smallest pinkie they have.
As long as its smaller than the space between their eyes, it is safe to feed.

Rexx



05/30/13  11:05pm

 #2297994


Nickey1848
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  Message To: Rexxaroo   In reference to Message Id: 2297978


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

This is a very good care sheet! Is there any way it can be pinned to the top of the page for new people to see and read easier? You did a great job!



05/31/13  12:21am

 #2297995


Rexxaroo
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  Message To: Nickey1848   In reference to Message Id: 2297994


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

Thanks Nickey! It is settled, i have had at least four members ask for it to be pinned, so I will contact the Webmaster and see if it can be done!

Rexx



05/31/13  01:21am

 #2298023


Rexxaroo
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  Message To: Rexxaroo   In reference to Message Id: 2297995


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

Bumping for New member.

Rexx



05/31/13  04:45pm

 #2298026


En3rgiz3r
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  Message To: Rexxaroo   In reference to Message Id: 2298023


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

Bump again, since my last post.



05/31/13  04:55pm

 #2298039


Husalah
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  Message To: En3rgiz3r   In reference to Message Id: 2298026


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

Very very nice job rex



05/31/13  11:23pm

 #2298041


Rexxaroo
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  Message To: Husalah   In reference to Message Id: 2298039


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

Thanks Husalah, I have sent a message to Doug but no response yet.
I’d be honored if this got stickied :)
I think it would help a lot of folks out!

Rexx



06/01/13  12:33am

 #2298074


Husalah
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  Message To: Rexxaroo   In reference to Message Id: 2298041


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

This should definitely be stickied it is pretty much everything you need to know about water dragons. You practically wrote a book on this website haha



06/01/13  01:21pm

 #2298082


Serinamarie89
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  Message To: Husalah   In reference to Message Id: 2298074


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

"You just have to show them you are more stubborn" LOL I put in an order for Dubias! As much as I want to give Beckett everything he wants (solely Meal Worms) this will be better in the long term. Thank you for all your help and great advice.



06/01/13  05:54pm

 #2298104


Audib30
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  Message To: Serinamarie89   In reference to Message Id: 2298082


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

Great care sheet! You covered everything that new CWD parents need to know! LOVE IT! I wish they would hand out this kind of stuff at pet stores so people would know what a commitment they are taking on!



06/02/13  07:40am

 #2298139


Rexxaroo
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  Message To: Audib30   In reference to Message Id: 2298104


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

Tell me about it! The stuff pet stores give out isn’t even close to what these animals actually need.
Im glad you all love the care sheet so much :)
Thanks for all the support, if anyone thinks anything in here needs changing, please feel free to tell me!

Rexx



06/03/13  09:38am

 #2298234


Rexxaroo
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  Message To: Rexxaroo   In reference to Message Id: 2298139


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

Bump for Jellyfish :)

Rexx



06/05/13  06:08pm

 #2298388


Rexxaroo
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  Message To: Rexxaroo   In reference to Message Id: 2298234


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

Bumping for Zippy

Rexx



06/11/13  05:37pm

 #2298769


Serinamarie89
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  Message To: Rexxaroo   In reference to Message Id: 2298388


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

Bumping because this helped me care for Beckett the best I can =] Its something everyone should read!!!!



06/23/13  03:03pm

 #2298926


Rexxaroo
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  Message To: Serinamarie89   In reference to Message Id: 2298769


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

Back to the top!
Keep in mind all, that this care sheet also suffices well for sailfin dragons.
Their care is very similar, only slight differences regarding behavior, size, global habitation.

Rexx



06/26/13  10:36pm

 #2299037


Saints
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  Message To: Rexxaroo   In reference to Message Id: 2298926


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

I need advice on HOW to build a custom enclosure.. I can’t really find anything anywhere?



06/29/13  04:34pm

 #2299060


Rexxaroo
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  Message To: Saints   In reference to Message Id: 2299037


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

Send me a PM, i will gladly send you a few links and a write up on materials and designs :)

Rexx



06/30/13  01:17am

 #2299135


En3rgiz3r
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  Message To: Rexxaroo   In reference to Message Id: 2297978


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

bump



07/01/13  02:13pm

 #2299324


Rexxaroo
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  Message To: En3rgiz3r   In reference to Message Id: 2299135


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

Bump



07/07/13  12:01am

 #2299518


Rexxaroo
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  Message To: Rexxaroo   In reference to Message Id: 2299324


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

Bump for Lena



07/13/13  01:15pm

 #2299892


Palmarie
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  Message To: Rexxaroo   In reference to Message Id: 2297978


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

Hi guys!!! I’ve been reading and re-reading everything I can get my hands on to create the best environment I can for a CWD.....I don’t have one yet, but I want everything set when I do in case I find a mature adult. So far all I am finding are hatchlings, I have a 70 gal tank for one if that is all I can find. My big cage is 4x4x2, wood on 3 sides, plexi doors on front that I will cover 1/3 of the way up and I’ll hang plants or put cling pics over the plexi. I want to try a MVB but I’m not sure if I should get a 100 or 160W. You said you use a 100W but I’m not sure of height of you enclosure. Would the 100W be sufficient for a 4ft enclos? I want to do that on top w/Ceramic heater then about 2/3 of the way down put 18in 10.0 tube w/75W heat bulb. So sorry if I missed that info on previous posts.....Thanks!!



07/23/13  05:31pm

 #2300500


En3rgiz3r
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  Message To: Palmarie   In reference to Message Id: 2299892


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

I suggest you start another thread on your questions, so everyone can give their opinion.
Mine setup is about the same measurements as yours, the only difference it’s a corner unit.
I use 160W MWB light and additional UVB fluorescent tube. My temps is 82-86F.

To all others who read this thread, plz, keep bumping it if any other topic comes on top.
Most of the answers could be find in this Ultimate Guide to Care CWD.



08/17/13  07:05pm

 #2300502


En3rgiz3r
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  Message To: Palmarie   In reference to Message Id: 2299892


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

bump



08/17/13  07:18pm

 #2301101


Scooter2
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  Message To: Rexxaroo   In reference to Message Id: 2297978


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

Bump



09/13/13  04:24pm

 #2301729


En3rgiz3r
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  Message To: Scooter2   In reference to Message Id: 2301101


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

Bump



10/16/13  06:12pm

 #2302187


En3rgiz3r
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  Message To: En3rgiz3r   In reference to Message Id: 2301729


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

Bump



11/08/13  05:37pm

 #2302669


Husalah
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  Message To: En3rgiz3r   In reference to Message Id: 2302187


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

Bump



12/13/13  12:28am

 #2303132


Scooter2
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  Message To: Rexxaroo   In reference to Message Id: 2297978


 The Ultimate Guide to Care and Keeping of Chinese Water Dragons

Bump



01/24/14  09:22pm

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