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 #2317585


The Bearded Derek
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 New Uromastyx, what now?

I recently just bought a Red Saharan (Or Nigerian, not sure what’s the difference but they look the same to me) Uromastyx and this is my first Uro however not my first reptile (I have 2 Leopard Geckos and a Blue Tongue Skink, used to have a veiled chameleon)

I don’t know much about it other than the fact it’s a Saharan/Nigerian Uro, it’s a herbivore and that it’s a male (Has large femoral pores and its hemipenes is apparent)

I have no idea how old he is, they told me he’s probably about a year old, I don’t know at what age they max their size, but right now he’s almost 12 inches long, the tip of his tail doesn’t end in a point, not sure if Uros are just like that or if he had his tail tip bitten off. He seems to have some dry or old scale spots on his back, belly, and his face, should I spray the spots with water or something if its old shed? His tail also has some dull colored spikes, some lost their tips, some are almost completely gone, although most of his spikes are nice and intact. I’ve heard of something called tail rot but when I googled it, it was just Uros with black rings on their tail, which he doesn’t have so he seemed fine to me. All his fingers are intact and his claws are pretty sharp lol. I did notice one of his nostrils (He has it on the other one too but it’s a lot more open than the other)has something that looks like a clay or something stuck in it. I’ve read they have can have salt minerals around his nose but it doesn’t look like that, the stuff in his nose is brown. He looks a little bit skinny to me but I’m not sure if that’s because he’s young or just because he’s flat.

He seems healthy in the sense that he’s pretty active and walks a lot. He’s barely skittish (Only runs when a loud noise pops out of nowhere and when a random person comes near him, but he’ll calm down after a couple seconds)

Right now his setup was small and quick, I have him in a 30 gallon tank, has a 50 watt bulb (an under tank heater as well to compensate for the low amount of heat) , a little bowl with some romaine lettuce, carrots, and some safflower seeds with calcium dust, and he’s on some coco fiber. Tomorrow I have to get him a bigger cage but I’m not sure what size is ideal for him (Whether a tank size perfect for his current size or a tank big enough that would be permanent for him, preferably a permanent one).

Just have a couple questions.

Exactly what foods can he and can’t he eat? How many watts does his heat bulb have to be?(I know his basking spot should be around 120-130 degrees but I don’t know how much that is in wattage)
What’s the minimum size tank that he should be in when he grows to his max size? Judging from his size, how old is he? Does he look healthy? What foods would entice him to eat? What foods do they normally like best? What diet would be best as a staple? Can I get his food and blend it (Maybe with a bit of water) into a very thick paste for him? Should I have him outside (I live in Hialeah, Florida, right now it’s 89% in humidity, knowing they’re a desert species, I’m not sure if this is too much for them to handle)?

This is him now, I’ll post more pictures from more angles later. (Yes the photo is edited, it was from my Instagram)



03/26/16  07:35pm

 #2317587


The Bearded Derek
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  Message To: The Bearded Derek   In reference to Message Id: 2317585


 New Uromastyx, what now?

Almost forgot to mention I tried hand feeding him some romaine lettuce, he didn’t want to eat it. Not sure if he wasn’t hungry, didn’t feel like eating, or just didn’t want to eat off my hand. (There doesn’t seem to be an edit button)



03/26/16  08:55pm

 #2317620


Cphill58
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  Message To: The Bearded Derek   In reference to Message Id: 2317587


 New Uromastyx, what now?

http://www.repticzone.com/caresheets/Uromastyx.html



03/28/16  10:22am

 #2317629


ClareWillett
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  Message To: The Bearded Derek   In reference to Message Id: 2317585


 New Uromastyx, what now?

Hi I red your concerns and issues and I can understand that from a new owner. Any who I do also own a Red Niger (Mushoo) He is also relatively small so don’t worry about it just means that he is healthy. They will usually inflate if you pick them up or when they feel intimidated or just want to show off. The enclosure you have for him sounds pretty great, mine is slightly on the tall side but that doesn’t matter.

You are correct about the basking spots and as for lighting if you live up north or areas where it get pretty chilly in winter I recommend having 2 bulbs. The main bulb should be at least 50 to 100 and make sure that the overall cage temp. is between 80 to 90. Make sure that the humidity is also below 40 or problems can occur.

Uros eat a variety of foods, but to make it easier I will list the most common:
Red romaine
dandelion leaves
Green beans
cactus pears
grapes
oak leaves
zucchini
collard greens
millet seeds
never feed them insects since they are strict veterinarian. Also make sure they get their seeds since it helps with digestion an is their protein intake. Finally I recommend that you go to your local pet store and but some calcium supplements.

The scale areas are not that concerning but sadly they don’t grow back. Mine was the same way when he arrived. just make sure that he is getting his nutrients and his cage is below humid and that will prevent spreading. Don’t spray the spots it will make it worse and cause scale rot which is not fun.

Other things you could do are get him some branches and rocks to climb on. Believe it or not they LOVE to climb so the more the merrier especially if one is close to the lamp.



03/29/16  09:27am

 #2317634


The Bearded Derek
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  Message To: ClareWillett   In reference to Message Id: 2317629


 New Uromastyx, what now?

How could I lower his humidity? I have him outside the house (I don’t have room inside) under a terrace so the sun doesn’t hit him but i’m sure he gets the Florida humidity out here where it’s pretty high. I have to get something to measure humidity.

I fed him squash recently, he seems to like it (Only food that I gave him that he accepted from hand feeding)
I also gave him some blue berries (Didn’t eat it and had to throw it out because of fruit flies) Bok choy and raddichio. It looks like he ate a few pieces of it but i’m not sure. Also how much at a time should I feed him? Does it also have to be super fresh? Most of the time he won’t eat all of it and then it just sits there. Should I take out the bowl when he’s done eating and put it in the fridge?



03/29/16  03:32pm

 #2317640


The Bearded Derek
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  Message To: The Bearded Derek   In reference to Message Id: 2317634


 New Uromastyx, what now?

It’s getting a little hard to feed him. He simply just doesn’t want to eat. I put a lot of squash (It was the only thing he ate off my hand that day so I assumed it was his favorite out of everything else I’ve given him) one tiny leaf of bok choy, and a few pieces of radicchio. I put it in the bowl, he simply ignores it and walks over it. I’ve given it to him on my hand, ate 2 pieces the other day, now he sometimes looks at it (One moment he bit it but didn’t eat it, as if he tried tasting it but didn’t like it) and then continues off and ignores it. I’ve also dropped it near him and I moved it around with a stick, it looks like when it’s moving he has a lot more interest to it and this got his attention more than anything else but still ignored it.

By the way, how many times do they poop in a day? I’ve only seen him poop twice since I got him (It’s been 4 days already)



03/30/16  02:31pm

 #2317643


ClareWillett
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  Message To: ClareWillett   In reference to Message Id: 2317629


 New Uromastyx, what now?

Yeah, they can be really picky eaters, I feed mine at least once a day and sometimes he eats only when he wants too. Some prefer fresh veggies and food but each uro is different than the rest. Try feeding him more fresh ones and remove the old. Also try feeding him a variety of foods sometimes they get bored of the same old dish.

As for humidity the best way to remove it would be an extra heat lamp to evaporate the excess water in the air. I use a 10 to 25 watt in the summer to bring down the humidity in my uro’s cage and that has been super effective. Also if you have a basment try moving him down there. One very important thing though is that since you live in Florida that when it rains move him inside or build a little roof over the cage so that no water gets inside.



03/31/16  08:19am

 #2317644


ClareWillett
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  Message To: ClareWillett   In reference to Message Id: 2317643


 New Uromastyx, what now?

Oh and another thing, yes the do not poop a whole lot. However if it has been weeks without seeing any new feces, he may have a case of constipation. Nothing to worry about just soak him in Luke-warm water for a while and everything should loosen up. If nothing happens a few days after that I recommend a vet. Don’t worry about eating, new uros will be shy about eating. Mine only eats when he is alone a weird habit I’ve noticed but he eats none the less. If no food looks like it has been touched try changing the diet.



03/31/16  08:27am

 #2317651


The Bearded Derek
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  Message To: ClareWillett   In reference to Message Id: 2317644


 New Uromastyx, what now?

He pooped today I believe, if not yesterday.

I’ve given him Radicchio, carrots, romaine lettuce, yellow squash, Bok Choy, safflower seeds, and blueberries. The only thing he’s eaten was squash (I hand fed him some), radicchio (He was opening his mouth for a few seconds because he had a tiny little coconut fiber in his mouth and while he was removing it and opening his mouth I put a piece of radicchio in his mouth and surprisingly he ate it all) possibly the lettuce (I had it in a bowl and the bowl looked emptier but I noticed there was a couple pieces all over the area as if he walked in the bowl and dragged some out accidentally) and some Hibiscus flowers that I gave him yesterday and today, he doesn’t seem super fond of them but it’s definitely the best thing that’s gotten his attention lately. Also, does it matter if he eats the flower with some ants? I got a few flowers from my neighbor’s plant as his is pretty big (According to him he doesn’t put fertilizer or poisons on it) I’m not sure if he just doesn’t want to eat if the food isn’t moving or if he simply doesn’t want to eat. Sometimes when I get some food for him and wave around his face without him seeing my arm (He closes his eyes sometimes when I’m about to do that, especially when he’s resting near the basking spot) and he’ll take a bite, he’s only willfully taken eaten out of my hand about 4 or 5 times.

Also I was wondering what substrates are best for him in terms of aesthetics? I hear play sand can be very good, safe, easy to clean, and can be aesthetically appealing if mixed with the right substrates. Which ones should I mix it with?

Another thing I noticed was when I handled him today for a few minutes to inspect something on his tail (I don’t know if it’s me but it looks like it gets slightly duller each day) and I noticed when he starts to walk on my hands he’ll sometimes rub the right side of his face on my fingers like he’s trying to burrow, he also did this on the glass in his tank once. He doesn’t seem to have anything on his face, what could this be?



03/31/16  03:11pm

 #2317664


ClareWillett
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  Message To: The Bearded Derek   In reference to Message Id: 2317651


 New Uromastyx, what now?

Sometimes you just got to be patient. Don’t force him to eat because that can cause him stress. He will eat when he feels like it trust me. If he is dragging food around that’s a good sign it means he is still eating. A lot of times, they will drag their food to a more secluded area to eat. Another thing but this is up to you not me; hand feed him every once in a while. Hand feeding can or may cause stress depending on how social your uro is.

Hibiscus flowers seem pretty interesting, I have no idea if they are a part of a uro’s diet but if he eats them then I guess its safe. I don’t think the ants will be an issue, just make sure they aren’t biting him or burrowing in his enclosure.

The dulling in his tail is nothing to worry about. I can mean 1 of 2 things: he is starting to shed or that particular part of him didn’t get that much warmth. Their tails tend to have less blood flow so sometimes when not in sunlight or warmth they become dull in color.

That’s rather nice he rubs your fingers! I wished mine did that, he just sits in my hand glaring at me and runs around my room non stop! In the wild, uros burrow so he could be trying to burrow in your hand same with the glass. Because of this its a good idea to have several layers of substrate in your enclosure for him to burrow in. Play sand is affordable, easy, and safe. You can mix it with just about any other substrate (Avoid ones for snakes and tortoises) any kind of reptile sand works and you can even use Eco Earth brand but make sure you let it air out for at least 2 days since it has a high concentration of water. A lot of people say walnut shells are a terrible idea, but that is just a myth. I have noticed my uro likes to scratch himself on the walnuts so I tend to leave some in there.

Another thing as well, If he starts "glass dancing" which is when he will attempt to climb the glass you might want to buy him some climbing logs so he doesn’t get any spinal injuries.



04/01/16  09:54am

 #2317670


The Bearded Derek
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  Message To: ClareWillett   In reference to Message Id: 2317664


 New Uromastyx, what now?

Seems like every day I experience him differently. Today I saw him walking around a lot, more than he usually does when he has his "active moments" and since I’ve noticed whenever he has those moments he normally accepts me hand feeding him without him being scared or minding me. I managed to give him a few tiny pieces of Bok choy, didn’t want to eat the rest of the leaf. While I was giving him food he willfully tried climbing my hand 3 times, in fact, one of the times he tried getting on my hand he actually tried jumping on to it to climb up my arm and this time instead of just calming down and sleeping on my hand like he did the first and second day I had him, he wouldn’t stop walking on my hands (I would make stairs with hands and he wouldn’t stop walking) but he wasn’t running or trying to get away, just normal paced walking.
And yes he was glass dancing a bit, all I have in there was a log cut in half for him to hide in but he never uses it (Other than to climb on) looks like he just prefers sleeping under the substrate.
Another thing about the substrate, does it matter if it’s dusty? When I first put in the coco fiber it was pretty dusty.



04/01/16  05:57pm

 #2317671


The Bearded Derek
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  Message To: The Bearded Derek   In reference to Message Id: 2317670


 New Uromastyx, what now?

Also (I keep forgetting to add stuff and I forget there’s no edit button) do they shed in patches or do they shed their entire body completely at one time? I’ve heard it takes them a while to completely shed but I don’t know if they shed in parts.



04/01/16  06:02pm

 #2317674


The Bearded Derek
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  Message To: The Bearded Derek   In reference to Message Id: 2317671


 New Uromastyx, what now?

By the way, is it possible for me to post an attachment? I have no idea how to work this site and I’d like to post a picture.



04/02/16  08:13am

 #2317700


ClareWillett
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  Message To: The Bearded Derek   In reference to Message Id: 2317674


 New Uromastyx, what now?

That’s great to hear that he is slowly coming out of his shell! It is also nice to hear that he accepts food from your hands, your’re very lucky to own such a trusting animal.

The dust won’t be an issue but if it bothers you, you can always change it.

Uros tend to shed in different ways. Most of the time it is done piece by piece instead of all at once. Don’t forcibly peel off any scales or shedding skin because you can accidental peel off the new below. If it looks like some skin is stuck such as the toes, dab the area with Luke-warm water and gently remove. Skin caught between the toes is common with most lizards and uros. It is best to remove it as soon as possible before it cuts off circulation to the toes. Uros tend to eat their sheded skin so don’t freak out when you catch them.

To submit a picture all you have to do is scroll to the bottom of the type your message page and just above the box are different little ones. just pick the image and upload a picture



04/04/16  10:14am

 #2317701


The Bearded Derek
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  Message To: ClareWillett   In reference to Message Id: 2317700


 New Uromastyx, what now?

Well, he’s still pretty skinny and I have yet to see him eat out of his bowl. He’s only eaten a few times out of my hand and he’s only eaten a few pieces of food. I changed his substrate to play sand, only bad thing I see about it is it can get cold pretty quickly, not exactly appealing to the eye (If you mix it with some other substrates it can look nice), but other than that seems fine. Should I try giving him some other food? I’ve given him Bok Choy, Romaine Lettuce, Hibiscus flowers, yellow squash, blue berries, bananas, safflower seeds, and radicchio, although he’s eaten some of it, he doesn’t exactly chow down on it. Any other food that would be great to encourage him? I also have this vitamin gel meant for sick or starved reptiles, should I give him some of that? It’s really pasty and I don’t know if it’ll make him thirsty, his urates still have a tiny piece of yellow on it.



04/04/16  12:02pm

 #2317702


The Bearded Derek
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  Message To: ClareWillett   In reference to Message Id: 2317700


 New Uromastyx, what now?

Well, he’s still pretty skinny and I have yet to see him eat out of his bowl. He’s only eaten a few times out of my hand and he’s only eaten a few pieces of food. I changed his substrate to play sand, only bad thing I see about it is it can get cold pretty quickly, not exactly appealing to the eye (If you mix it with some other substrates it can look nice), but other than that seems fine. Should I try giving him some other food? I’ve given him Bok Choy, Romaine Lettuce, Hibiscus flowers, yellow squash, blue berries, bananas, safflower seeds, and radicchio, although he’s eaten some of it, he doesn’t exactly chow down on it. Any other food that would be great to encourage him? I also have this vitamin gel meant for sick or starved reptiles, should I give him some of that? It’s really pasty and I don’t know if it’ll make him thirsty, his urates still have a tiny piece of yellow on it.

Also I tried posting the photo but it just says "This image is not available"



04/04/16  12:03pm

 #2317711


The Bearded Derek
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  Message To: The Bearded Derek   In reference to Message Id: 2317702


 New Uromastyx, what now?

To be honest, I’m almost about to start force feeding him because he’s just too skinny and refuses to eat. He might look decent in the OP pic but every time he’s laying down and we’re not touching him he gets deflated and that’s when you can see how skinny he is.

Should I really force feed him or try getting him some sort of food that’ll definitely get him to eat? If so, what food should I use? I don’t think I should wait any longer because if he sometimes eats out of my hand, then its definitely not stress. Or at least it shouldn’t be.



04/04/16  04:44pm

 #2317713


ClareWillett
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  Message To: The Bearded Derek   In reference to Message Id: 2317701


 New Uromastyx, what now?

Like before as long as he is still eating it is no issue. If you are really worried about it I Highly recommend you ask your vet if force feeding is necessary, since that is only used in extreme cases. Best to ask a vet with medical experience before you take matters into your own hands. You should also ask about the vitamin gel as well. Like the saying goes, don’t fix something if it’s not broken and your uro dose not sound ill. Giving any animal medicine that is not need can make the animal even more sick.

I also highly recommend that you give him calcium supplements and Vitamin D3. A reason why you uro could not be eating is lack of calcium and vitamins.

Finally about his size. Depending on the species of uro they vary in sizes. Your uro species is on the small side. The reason why he inflates or swells up when you touch him is a reflexive move, kind of like when a stranger touches you and you tense up. The swelling in size is a defensive maneuver to give him the appearance of looking bigger than he actually is. The swelling of size is also a way of displaying and asserting dominance. You have probuby noticed that when you stop holding or touching him he shrinks, thats just him letting out all of that air and calming down.

Here is a link of a care sheet that I have created for new uro owners:


Uro Care Sheet



04/05/16  06:43am

 #2317714


ClareWillett
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  Message To: ClareWillett   In reference to Message Id: 2317713


 New Uromastyx, what now?

Here it is copy and pasted in case you can’t pull it up:

DIET
Uros have a large variety of foods such as lettuces, greens, seeds, fruits, veggies, and even flowers. For a healthy diet try to incorporate different types instead of just one type for a healthy and active uro. Veggies and leaves are a major diet. Flowers, weeds, and fruits should only be used once in awhile as a treat. make sure you finely shred, tear or chop your uros meal, so it can eat. No water is needed, since they are desert dwelling animals. They get all of their water from their food.
romaine
oak leaf
lollo rosso
tango
collard greens
carrots
green beans
bell peppers
beet greens
mizuna
arugula
rocket
frisse
endive
radicchio
kale
bok choi
mustard greens
dandelion leaves
pumpkin
squash
zucchini
sweet potatoes
prickly pear cactus
millet seeds
apples
canalpoe
strawberries
papaya
mangos
Dandelion
Hawkbit
Cat’s Ear
Clovers
Trefoils
Mallows
Cheeseweed Mallow
Silverbushes
Purslane
Vetches
Bindweeds
Sedums (avoid sedum acre, possibly toxic)
Nettle
Chickweed
calcium and vitamin D (once a week)
ABSOLUTELY NO INSECTS (strictly a vegetarian species)
NO WATER!!!!!!

BEDDING/CAGING
Uros love to burrow, so it’s important you add a couple of inches of bedding to your uros cage. Make sure you take the time to choose the right bedding. For example, snake bedding will not do. If you choose to use sand, make sure it is lizard friendly and avoid sand with large grains. If you choose to use the Eco Earth brand make sure it is completely dry. Leave it out for a day or two before you put it in your uro’s cage. It will raise the cage to high humidity levels. Uros also love to climb. Be sure to add a couple of logs and branches for them to climb on. Also include a hidey hole for them to retreat to when too hot or stressed.
sand is fine (commercial is also)
Eco Earth (must be completely dry)
grounded walnuts (theses are harmless despite what others say)
logs and hidey holes are encouraged

HEATING/HUMIDITY
Uros are desert dwellers and love heat, but too much of a good thing can be a bad thing. Depending on which region you are from a 100 watt UVB light is best. If your house gets pretty cold during the winter, bump it up to 150 watts and add a smaller 25 watt light bulb for night. a heating pad for underneath the cage is also recommended. To regulate body temperature, leave a spot untouched by heat in an area of the cage. Uros will retreat there to cool off. The basking area, where they go to warm up, should be around 100 to 120 degrees. Make sure the humidity is less than 45. If it’s higher, get some airflow going through that cage until it drops.
100 watts/150 watts in winter (depending on which region you are from)
cage should be between 100 to 80 degrees
basking area should be 120 degrees
cool area should be 60 to 70 degrees
humidity should be less than 45

BEHAVIORS/ILLNESSES
A uro will perform some behaviors throughout its life. Some are good and some are bad. Unusual behaviors are of course bad; however, some are completely normal and expected. Illnesses are also a factor. make sure you keep an eye on your uro if it becomes lethargic, refuses to eat, or any other common signs of illness. The illnesses listed here and behaviors are the most common.
GLASS DANCING: sighns of glass dancing include you uro scratching at the glass or trying to climb up the glass. when this happens, it’s usually because there is nothing for them to climb onto. Make sure you have a variety of logs for them to climb onto. If it still continues to do it, or less frequently, it could be just bored. no need to be concerned unless you start to see back or walking problems.
CONSTANT HIDING: When you first get your uro it may hide a lot. This is normal. DO NOT REMOVE IT FROM ITS HIDEY HOLE! If you do so, this can cause it great stress and it will take it longer to become more used to its new surroundings. time and space will make it emerge and be more social. It is also not a bad idea to take out you uro and hold it, in fact it is encouraged. By handling your uro you are teaching it to be both friendly and social. Uros also burrow so don’t disturb it if it is burrowing.
WHITE CRUSTY MUCUS FROM NOSE: With your uro, you will notice some white crusty mucus from the nostrils. This is normal and it is a sign of healthiness. What it is is salt deposit. Uros remove excess salt from their body from their nostrils. If it makes you uncomfortable, you can gently remove it. If their is no salt coming out, take your uro to your vet immediately.
SCALE/TAIL ROT: Scale/tail rot is caused by too much humidity in a cage. Scales will become yellowish in color and fall off, leaving behind inflamed patches of skin. The tail will grow mold inside the rivets, which is very uncomfortable. Sadly however, the scales normally don’t grow back. and their is no cure. if you see signs of scale/tail rot check its cage and keep the humidity in check before it can get any worse. Keep a close eye on the unhealthy scales and watch for any more rotting ones. Symptoms include: inflamed skin, discolored scales, refusal to eat, and lethargic.
MOUTH ROT: Mouth rot is caused when there is not enough heat in the cage . The jaw will become inflamed, swollen and will begin to ooze pus, which can be very painful. When this happens take your uro to the vet. Antibiotics are given to reduce swelling. Make sure your uro’s cage is warm enough and if it has already happened give it very fine, soft foods so it does not need to chew. Symptoms include: lethargy, inflamed jaw, and refusal to eat.
CONSTIPATION: Constipation in uros usually happen when it eats something it can not digest like too big of sand or even the wrong type of food. No need for a vet trip if this happens. A quick soak in lukewarm water will loosen up its tract and it will be able to pass. However, if no change is present bring your uro to a vet immediately. Symptoms include: lethargy, refusal to eat, no sign of droppings, passes loud skinny pops, and straining to go.
HESITATION TO EAT: Usually when this happens your uro is still getting used to it’s new home. DO NOT PANIC this is normal and common. Your uro will tend to be very seclusive when it eats or depending on your uro’s personality. As long as there are pieces of food scattered about and or there is less food in the bowl or in the cage then your uro is eating. Make sure that they are getting all of their vitamins and needed nutrients including supplements and seeds. If your uro still refuses to eat take it to a Vet and they will decide if you need to force feed or not since force feed causes more stress.
SIZE: Depending on your species of uro they vary in size. Egyptians are the largest species while Nigeria and Mali are on the small size. Most uros you tend to se are swelled up. This is a defensive, aggressive, and display behavior. When threatened they will swell up larger than their normal size.



04/05/16  07:37am

 #2317769


The Bearded Derek
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  Message To: ClareWillett   In reference to Message Id: 2317714


 New Uromastyx, what now?

I took him to the vet the day before yesterday. The vet said he had some sort of worm, he wasn’t sure what type it was as it was only one worm and the fecal sample was too small (There’s practically nothing in his colon) took an X-ray, said he might have a very minor MBD since his right knee is slightly bigger than his left one. The assistant bathed him in a tub for a bit and he drank a lot of water. At the end of the day he gave me 3 medicines (A highly concentrated vitamin syrup, an oral syrup for infections, and an antibiotic) and told me to force feed him some food every day but not to feed too much so he won’t vomit. Good thing is since that day he hasn’t gone any skinnier, however he’s not as active as before, he’s a bit more lethargic than normally, except when we give him his medicines, he starts to move a bit.



04/11/16  03:35pm


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