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Julie2392   GiovanniB   Lego Movie Dude  

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 #2304217


Julie2392
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 Dehydrated uro

Hi, I just got a young red niger uromastyx last thursday, and he is looking fairly dehydrated (loose skin). I have him in a 55 gal tank on white proso millet. The basking temp is 110. I don’t have a uvb light yet but I will be getting it. I give him some spring mix daily but he doesnt seem to eat a whole lot of it, it mostly gets tossed around, but he has made a bowel movement. I have the tank covered with towels to help him adjust and I don’t handle him. How can I rehydrate him if he is not really eating? I have seen some people soak their uros but since he is new and young I dont think it’s a very good idea. Any suggestions? Thank you!



03/26/14  02:12pm

 #2304263


GiovanniB
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  Message To: Julie2392   In reference to Message Id: 2304217


 Dehydrated uro

I took this from the Deer Fern website and it should help you out.

"Water: Opportunities to drink are a rare occurrence in the wild for most species of Uromastyx. Uromastyx solve this problem by producing metabolic water from their digesting food. As long as their bellies are relatively full, most are making more than enough water to meet all their needs. Thus we don’t normally offer water to our healthy Uros. The exceptions are for newly acquired/shipped animals, individuals which haven’t kept up a reasonable gut mass of digesting food, females which are near term-gravid or have just laid their clutch, and for fresh hatchlings. Individuals with near empty bellies MUST be offered drinking water on a regular basis. If a Uromastyx goes off-feed, their bellies slowly empty. As this progresses, their bodies tend to dehydrate. As they dehydrate, appetite is often further suppressed, resulting in a spiral down towards death. (Note: dehydrated animals have limited abilities to process proteins so don’t offer insects or dry bean mixes to an overly thin, dehydrated Uromastyx. The burden on the kidneys and livers may prove fatal months down the road). Despite all I’ve stated above, there are still very few circumstances when it is acceptable to put a water bowl in a Uromastyxs’ cage. If you feel an individual needs water, take him or her to a tub filled with approximately 1/2" of bath-water hot (100F) water . It must be as warm as you can safely make it so that the individual stays near their optimum body temperature (103F). Some will drink on their own, others can be enticed by dripping water on their snout. (Note: Saharan Uromastyx are prone to aspirating water into the lungs so be very careful when soaking them. Put them very slowly into the tub and keep the water very shallow (1/4" max.) Other Uro species seem much less likely to have this problem). Many unacclimated individuals will not drink while being watched. You must leave their line of sight. It’s also wise to leave them undisturbed for a few minutes after drinking to avoid them regurgitating. Truly dehydrated animals may need to be tubed with a warmed electrolyte solution. See your vet if you are unfamiliar with this procedure. Using Pedialtye or even Gatorade or similar product instead of water for the soak is one way to supply these electrolytes. Just make sure to rinse the solution off them and dry them well afterwards. The hindgut is also capable of absorbing water, so use of dilute electrolyte/vitamin enemas may also be useful for seriously dehydrated individuals. Individuals with intestinal problems (parasites or bacterial infections) may not be able to absorb water through the gut and will need to be taken to a Vet for injections of a saline/glucose and sterile water mixture (even ratio of each is usually best). Note it’s easiest to give this injection under the front arm pits - if placed just right, you hit what appears to be a lymph duct and you can easily inject several cc’s of fluid without any backwash out of the injection site. If you tube them orally, juveniles usually will hold down 1 to 2 cc, medium adults 5 cc, large adults 7 to 10 cc’s of fluid. While it’s easy to give more than this, they will often regurgitate larger amounts a few minutes to hours later. If given rectally, reduce these doses by about 1/3."

There’s the direct link below

Deer Fern Farms



03/29/14  08:19pm

 #2315233


Lego Movie Dude
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  Message To: Julie2392   In reference to Message Id: 2304217


 Dehydrated uro

I Also have a red Niger Uro and at first he was dehydrated but try putting a water bowl there and some foods that are high in water.



10/15/15  08:38pm


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