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 #2296768


Marvthegirl
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 Nighttime time too warm

I have a baby mali uromastyx. I have had her for three weeks, and the nighttime temp was okay at first, but now the nights are getting warmer in Arizona. So, I am having a hard time getting the night temperature below the low 80’s, and that is with me turning of the ceramic heat emitter. The daytime temperatures are good, with about 95-100 in warm area with basking surface temp around 115, and the cool side around 85. Does anyone have any ideas on how I can make it cooler at night.



05/03/13  07:11pm

 #2296778


LookingforUro
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  Message To: Marvthegirl   In reference to Message Id: 2296768


 Nighttime time too warm

I think low 80s is a great night time temp.. I wish I could keep my night time temps that high.



05/03/13  09:47pm

 #2296809


Benedita
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  Message To: Marvthegirl   In reference to Message Id: 2296768


 Nighttime time too warm

All of the lights and heat emitters are off in the room?
turn on the room’s A/C.



05/04/13  11:53am

 #2296844


Marvthegirl
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  Message To: Benedita   In reference to Message Id: 2296809


 Nighttime temp too warm

Yes, I turn off the lights and heat emitter, and I do have my A/C on.



05/05/13  08:09am

 #2296943


Benedita
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  Message To: Marvthegirl   In reference to Message Id: 2296844


 Nighttime temp too warm

is the room temperature significantly cooler?
how’s the ventilation in the enclosure? can you improve the air circulation?
If achieve good overnight temperatures later in the evening, how about putting the heat emitters on separate timers so the cool down starts earlier in the day?



05/06/13  10:02pm

 #2296946


Vers
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  Message To: Benedita   In reference to Message Id: 2296943


 Nighttime temp too warm

I’m not sure why you are so concerned with this...nighttime temps in the low to mid 80s is perfectly fine.



05/06/13  10:43pm

 #2297028


UROKEEPER
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  Message To: Marvthegirl   In reference to Message Id: 2296768


 Nighttime time too warm

I would definitely keep night temps in the low to mid 70’s. 80 is too high but it’s not going to harm the uro. It is not natural. I would only have night temps in the 80’s for a sick animal or one undergoing medical treatments. I would also increase your basking surface to 120-140 measured by IR tempgun. does the animal have a large enough enclosure to facilitate these temps?. I would increase the thermostat on the A/C if it is central air, if it is a window unit you may need a larger ’btu’ unit. I agree with benedita fans also help move cool air low to the ground. Is there any way you can keep the house in the low 70’s day/night? my A/C keep the house 70 during the day and 75 at night because I have so much lighting being used. if not it would be out of control. I bet its hot in Arizona and only going to get hotter.



05/08/13  03:12am

 #2297066


Vers
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  Message To: UROKEEPER   In reference to Message Id: 2297028


 Nighttime time too warm

Do you know what den/burrow temps drop to at night in the wild during the warmer months? If so, would you happen to have a link to the source you obtained such info from?

I’m just wondering why do you believe these temps are acceptable? I know you said they are "unnatural", and even if they are I think it’s important to note that there are a lot of unnatural things we subject our animals to, like keeping them in boxes, on playsand or tile or feeding them lettuces and other unnatural food items.



05/08/13  04:10pm

 #2297074


Vers
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  Message To: Vers   In reference to Message Id: 2297066


 Nighttime time too warm

That was supposed to read ’unacceptable’, by the way.



05/08/13  07:48pm

 #2297091


UROKEEPER
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  Message To: Vers   In reference to Message Id: 2297074


 Nighttime time too warm

Danny Molco has done such studies with ornates and Aegyptia. yes keeping these animals in ’boxes’ (I prefer very big boxes) is unnatural and the foods we feed are unnatural but actually more nutritious. I believe if the conditions are favorable captive uro’s live longer than wild uro’s. Again yes we do many unnatural things when keeping captive uro’s but I strongly believe making it as natural as we possibly can. If we can provide something more natural why not do it? if it is in our power to do so. night temps of 70-75 have been the standard/norm for decades of keeping these animals.I’m not sure why all of a sudden it’s like these temps are unknown or unfounded. Strange



05/09/13  10:02am

 #2297092


UROKEEPER
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  Message To: Vers   In reference to Message Id: 2297074


 Nighttime time too warm

the microclimate varies by local and burrow depth. there are temperature and humidity gradients inside a burrow. in the warmer months there may be some areas of the burrow that are into the 80’s and maybe even higher but this has humidity inside also which many keepers lack in a captive environment. As I said before it’s not going to harm the uro however I would lean to a temperature in the 70’s at night in captivity.



05/09/13  10:29am

 #2297098


Vers
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  Message To: UROKEEPER   In reference to Message Id: 2297091


 Nighttime time too warm

I have read Molco’s reports but, to my knowledge, he’s only noted that nest burrow temps reach 96f...I do not recall him mentioning anything about living burrow/den temperatures at all. As for your argument, to keep it as natural as possible, I believe this to be a sort of catch 22 topic. If you want to keep things natural, then why feed a more optimized diet? Do these animals require a 10-20* drop in temperature at night to remain in good health? Do we know 70-75 is better than the low 80s, or have people just been assuming this for decades? I ask because I have yet to see any evidence that proves this is optimal for these animals, nor have I seen any information that states low 80s to be less optimal. More importantly I have no idea what subterranean temperatures are during the warmer months across various natural ranges. I’m by no means trying to reinvent the wheel here, but I just do not believe there is anything at all wrong with keeping ambient nighttime temps in the low 80s, and who really knows...perhaps it’s actually more beneficial? IMO this is something worth digging into, just for the sake of further understanding.



05/09/13  12:32pm

 #2298142


Vers
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  Message To: Vers   In reference to Message Id: 2297098


 Nighttime time too warm

I just wanted to add, having stumbled upon it recently, that ground temperatures within U. aegypticus’ natural range (Eilat Israel) measure between ~69-95f depending on depth (in this case 105cm) and time of year (average temp = 80.71f between Aug. 2000 and Jan 2002). In addition humidity levels taken from the same area were surprisingly low. At depths ranging from 60cm to 120cm soil humidity peaked at 10.1% @ 80cm in July. In September ground humidity ranged from 4.6-7.2% at the same depth. During the time of testing (July-Sept. of 2000) within the specific area ground humidity levels never rose above 10.1% between 60cm and 120cm. Granted the given data was collected from a small area relative to total natural range, but it provides a bit of an idea as to the conditions these animals are subjected to in the wild.

Here is a direct Link to the tables that provide such information.



06/03/13  10:41am


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