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 #2031438


Mikeyp
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 Young nippy blood

I recently just got a female black blood, about 3 months old. She seems very defensive and nippy, although from what I read this is fairly common. Its a new experience for me because my red blood carnage was basically dog tame since I got him and he was 3 months old. The black blood is initially defensive but once she is out, she is handleable as long as there are no jerky movements by her head. I’ve taken my fair share of bites already. Has anyone dealt with a nippy youngster like mine? Or have any advice on how to deal with this? Any input would be great! Thanks.



06/30/09  09:47am

 #2031950


Catfish_82
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  Message To: Mikeyp   In reference to Message Id: 2031438


 Young nippy blood

Mikey, how long between getting her home and in her new setup and handling her did you wait? With bloods, the longer that period the better. Younger bloods will be very defensive and nippy. She’ll just need some time. Actually it sounds as if some progress has been made if she’s only getting defensive when you initially take her out. Just give her time and I’m sure she’ll be fine. I’d love to see some photos. Good luck.



07/01/09  05:56am

 #2041300


Snakey68
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  Message To: Mikeyp   In reference to Message Id: 2031438


 Young nippy blood

bloods are prone to being nippy as youngsters the best way to deal with imo is to ignore it and handle them with confidence ( and gloves to aid this whilst they are going through the transition of handling)

One of my bloods a female was so nippy she used to jump out my hands like a coiled spring at people, but she is very tame now she is almost fully grown. They usually calm down after 6 months or so as long as they are eating and the husbandry is good and you handle regularly for short periods they should almost always come round.

Patience is definitely required with bloods they are cautious and nervous by nature and even as adults they huff and puff alot during handling its part of their nature in that breed of snake. Personally I like it myself as it defines the character of them in general.

Dont approach them in their enclosure straight ahead always come round the side if need be if they look particularly nervous you cna place a newspaper or something similar over their heads while you gently lift them out by the body.

Mine are so big I have to drag them out their enclosure now lol

As I said patience with bloods is a must and ability to read snake behaviour is advantageous and why they are not considered beginner snakes but a sensible approach should see you ok.



07/18/09  02:33pm

 #2041301


Snakey68
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  Message To: Mikeyp   In reference to Message Id: 2031438


 Young nippy blood

bloods are prone to being nippy as youngsters the best way to deal with imo is to ignore it and handle them with confidence ( and gloves to aid this whilst they are going through the transition of handling)

One of my bloods a female was so nippy she used to jump out my hands like a coiled spring at people, but she is very tame now she is almost fully grown. They usually calm down after 6 months or so as long as they are eating and the husbandry is good and you handle regularly for short periods they should almost always come round.

Patience is definitely required with bloods they are cautious and nervous by nature and even as adults they huff and puff alot during handling its part of their nature in that breed of snake. Personally I like it myself as it defines the character of them in general.

Dont approach them in their enclosure straight ahead always come round the side if need be if they look particularly nervous you cna place a newspaper or something similar over their heads while you gently lift them out by the body.

Mine are so big I have to drag them out their enclosure now lol

As I said patience with bloods is a must and ability to read snake behaviour is advantageous and why they are not considered beginner snakes but a sensible approach should see you ok.



07/18/09  02:36pm

 #2041499


Catfish_82
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  Message To: Snakey68   In reference to Message Id: 2041301


 Young nippy blood

Snakey, it’s great to hear from you again. You’ve been gone for a while man. I take it you’ll be around more these days?



07/19/09  04:42am

 #2041514


Snakey68
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  Message To: Catfish_82   In reference to Message Id: 2041499


 Young nippy blood

yeah I should be around more now thanks for kind words mate. Good to see people getting hold of these brilliant snakes and posting here seems to be quite active which is a good thing.





07/19/09  06:11am

 #2041796


Mikeyp
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  Message To: Snakey68   In reference to Message Id: 2041514


 Young nippy blood

Thanks for the advice, I have been following all of the above and have seen major improvements already. Now its to the point where I can get her out of the tub and handle her with out her even striking, as long as I read her body language correctly.



07/19/09  06:31pm

 #2043430


Snakey68
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  Message To: Mikeyp   In reference to Message Id: 2041796


 Young nippy blood

Quote:

I can get her out of the tub and handle her with out her even striking, as long as I read her body language correctly.



good glad to hear it and remember snakes or reptiles in general are in comparison to say cats and dogs very instinctive in their responsiveness. They react more than respond so act accordingly and continue reading / learning their behaviour.



07/22/09  03:42pm

 #2247814


Cleverdv8tion
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  Message To: Mikeyp   In reference to Message Id: 2031438


 Young nippy blood

relax...it is common. the best way to do it is to not over push handeling her head. make sure she isnt hungry and you dont smell like prey or household animals. then, instead of going right for her head. slowly work you hands uo the body petting her like untill you eventually get to the head. show her it is ok to be touched. was this snake captive bred, captive born or imported. it realy does make a difference. is she biting, or just striking defensivley but not actual bite? are you handeling her less than 48 hours past when she was last fed?



12/20/11  04:55am


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