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 #2319092


Escape312
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 Habitat conditions advice?

My baby sav has 60% overall humidity, 6 inches of topsoil and sand in its 5x2x2 foot enclosure, small logs, sticks and rocks.
85-90 degrees on hot side with 110 degree basking spot, using a 45 watt flood light and a 25 watt UVB. My main question would be whether or not 110 isn’t hot enough or is too hot for basking site while its still young. I haven’t been able to spot her basking at all since she is new to the enclosure and me so she avoids being seen at all costs. Only things I can get her to eat is superworms and boiled egg, I avoid the eggs as much as possible and mostly just feed the superworms since she won’t even try Dubias or mealworms. What else should be done to keep this lizard happy and mentally stimulated?

Any advice is appreciated!

Thanks in advance



07/11/16  03:54pm

 #2319094


PuppyLizard
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  Message To: Escape312   In reference to Message Id: 2319092


 Habitat conditions advice?

Buy a 100 gallon horse water trough (Rubbermaid at Tractor Supply ) and fill it full of soil/sand at a ratio of about 4/1.Add water until you can pick up a handful and squeeze and it stays together but does not drip moisture. Cut a hole in the bottom of your 5x2x2 enclosure and affix it to the trough. You need to know this is still not big enough for the full grown monitor, but will buy you 6 months or so. This will allow for burrowing--which is THE MOST IMPORTANT THING. Get your basking spot temps up to 130+. Once she is tong feeding, tempt her to that spot to feed. Try mixing the things you want her to eat into the eggs. I coat the "favorite foods"in a calcium supplement. Then all new foods are also coated in that supplement. Summerdog goes for it because it smells like "favorite food". Establish a routine, like feeding every day at 7 PM. She will be waiting for you after only a week or so. All animals learn routine quickly. Move slowly and methodically, talking the whole time. These are very observant animals and they don’t miss much. Use that to your advantage. Highly rewarding...



07/11/16  04:53pm

 #2319095


3240
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  Message To: PuppyLizard   In reference to Message Id: 2319094


 Habitat conditions advice?

Great advice!



07/11/16  05:57pm

 #2319096


PuppyLizard
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  Message To: 3240   In reference to Message Id: 2319095


 Habitat conditions advice?

Gee, thanks. ;)



07/11/16  06:01pm

 #2319097


Varanus Sapien
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  Message To: PuppyLizard   In reference to Message Id: 2319096


 Habitat conditions advice?

Another option would be to build a large 8x4x6 enclosure either use a metal trough, cause rubber one with be dug right through, or build it to hold at least 2ft of sand/soil mix (Kelloggs Organic mix is what I use at Home Depot comes with sand mix in it for $5.50 a bag). Build big now so you dont have to redo it in few months.



07/11/16  07:34pm

 #2319098


PuppyLizard
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  Message To: Varanus Sapien   In reference to Message Id: 2319097


 Habitat conditions advice?

The trough Rubbermaid makes is actually a very hard plastic that is thick and looks a little like "spun" material and sort of resembles fiberglass in appearance. But I agree that the metal trough should work just as well. We keep horses and have used the ones that are flexible and look like rubber (they seem to develop leaks the fastest), galvanized metal tanks (eventually after many years will rust out on the bottom) and the Rubbermaid hard plastic (will crack in extreme cold--but that is not an issue here). Horses are harder on troughs than lizards, though, so probably any of those troughs would work. The metal and the Rubbermaid are rigid and would hold the weight of your enclosure well. You can actually use wood screws to attach the enclosure to the rim of the Rubbermaid trough. That’s what we did to keep it from moving around. I agree that if you are able to construct the big enclosure now it will save time and effort in the long run.



07/12/16  06:15am


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