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PuppyLizard   Dajuice   Varanus Sapien   PuppyLizard  

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 #2318897


PuppyLizard
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 Monitor Progress

So I’ve had my little Sav for a bit over a month now and he’s grown over two inches! He is currently 11.5 ". He has a great appetite and I really enjoy watching him eat. Our routine every evening is I tempt him out of his burrow by shaking a baggie full of crickets. Once out, I pick him up and put him in a shallow feeding enclosure and feed with tongs. I make a clicking sound (like you would to a horse) each time I offer a food item and he’s starting to associate the sound with food. After I feed him, I put him in a container of water to soak and hopefully poop. Then I let him out to roam for about 10 or 15 minutes. This week he began climbing onto my hand when I offered it. Tonight he was so inquisitive, snooping all around, checking out my iPad and watching my fingers type, and amazingly, he crawled onto me and stretched out in the open for awhile. Now he’s curled up next to my leg under a blanket. Today was really a breakthrough because he seemed to have no fear of me and was very confident moving around me. I know from reading your posts that many of you who have dozens of monitors, are serious breeders, or have more flighty types don’t really try to build a relationship with an individual animal. And that makes sense. But for those of you who do view your monitor as a pet, and have one that is responsive, I’d love to hear about it and any techniques you use to give your animal the confidence to be comfortable with you. Thanks, Carla



06/24/16  07:09pm

 #2318903


Dajuice
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  Message To: PuppyLizard   In reference to Message Id: 2318897


 Monitor Progress

Just keep doing what you are doing. Of all monitors savs seem to seek attention or try to communicate to get what they want, to explore, food etc. So you’re off to a good start. I have a black throat that trust and tolerates me enough to allow for interaction. Food, patience and consistently is the key.



06/24/16  09:07pm

 #2318904


Varanus Sapien
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  Message To: Dajuice   In reference to Message Id: 2318903


 Monitor Progress

It’s been almost a year and mine is still not totally sure about me and my intentions. When she/he is roaming, it will regularly look back to see what I am doing before proceeding. I think this is typical of varanids, to be alert and aware at all times. Argus monitors do not like be restrained but I have yet to be bitten while holding Fiona. I was bitten while attempting to measure her with a tailors’ tape measure. I suppose it looked like a serpent and frightened the lizard.



06/24/16  10:40pm

 #2318909


PuppyLizard
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  Message To: Varanus Sapien   In reference to Message Id: 2318904


 Monitor Progress

It’s been awhile since I’ve had a monitor. My first one, Jake, was so smart. I could tell by the way he observed his world that there was a lot going on in his head. I was fascinated by him from the start and spent a lot of time with him. Keeping him was one of the most rewarding animal experiences I’ve had. He died of TB at age 6, diagnosed on necropsy at the University of Tennessee. I have really missed him. He was well known locally, because my vet friend and I would take him to elementary schools to teach children about reptiles. We had a lot of fun with him. I’ve always wanted another one, and this new little guy has already been so rewarding. I’m no lizard whisperer, but as with any animal, it seems that the more you know about their natural behavior and habitat, the better chance you have of giving them confidence and you a way to work into their world. I work with horses for a living, and it is important with them to address them from their perspective and try to understand why they react the way they do. The problem most people have with a horse is expecting it to act like a dog. The horse is not capable of being a dog and it is wrong to expect that, setting horse and person up for disappointment. It must be the same for lizards. And even though I playfully refer to my monitor as Puppy Lizard, I am earnestly trying to relate to him for what he is ---and appreciate his life as an intelligent reptile. I want to set us both up for success and him for a healthy happy life. I’ve been reading the archives from this forum. There is a lot of experience and wisdom here. Carla



06/25/16  06:20am


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