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 #2099439


Ammeratsu
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 I Need Help!

My horse, Esperanza, has been too much to handle for me. I’ve been riding for less than a year, and now that it’s winter she’s been really bad. I handled it fined until yesterday.

I had just started warming her up and picked up a rising trot. In the corner, she started cantering, but I didn’t ask her to canter, so I pulled back and released the reins and she broke into a full blown gallop! She raced around the arena and I tried every trick I could think of to slow her down, but they just made her go faster. I didn’t want to pull her into a circle because she was galloping really fast. She kept going in a smaller and smaller circle and she kept slipping and I was scared she was going to fall on her(been my fear for a long time). I didn’t know what to do, and I’d stayed pretty calm until that point. I was kind of panicking a bit, and I was in two point and she kept getting faster. Eventaully, she made a really unexpected turn and I lost one of my stirrups. I felt myself falling so I just threw myself off(wouldn’t rather throw myself off then fall and get trampled). My arena has rubber footing, so it doesn’t let you roll or skid so I kinda folded over myself and I hurt a muscle in my neck and got some nasty scraped and bruises, but I’m oay otherwise.

But now I’m afraid of her. I don’t know how to stop her if she does it again, and I really really don’t want to fall off at a full gallop everytime I ride her. I made sure my heels were down, that I wasnt touching her sides, my reins were taught, I tried take and release, I tried lifting the reins and pulling, I tried sitting in the saddle and doing take and release, I tried a whole bunch of weird movement with the reins, but everything just seemed to make her go faster.

How do I stop her from taking off? I’m getting so frustrated with her because I can’t get her to behave, and I don’t know how to handle her. My mom thinks I should just keep riding her and suck it up, but I kinda want my mom to school her and get her to stop. Because Espy tried to run off with her after I fell and she just halted her. But I can’t get her to hault, because whenever I pull back(even lightly) on the reins she won’t stop and just goes faster.

And now that I’m afraid of her, I know she’ll take advantage of me.

Any tips?



11/27/09  03:01pm

 #2099555


Karrie123
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  Message To: Ammeratsu   In reference to Message Id: 2099439


 I Need Help!

Don’t be afraid of her!



11/27/09  10:30pm

 #2099985


Ammeratsu
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  Message To: Karrie123   In reference to Message Id: 2099555


 I Need Help!

Easier said than done =P

I’m not supposed to ride her for another week(so frustrating! She’s going to be so bad when I get back on in a week) since I came off her when she bolted, and then I came off our filly twice when she bolted, because I hurt my ankle, arm, and neck so my mom won’t let me ride. (grrr)

I really need help with this, people.



11/29/09  06:56pm

 #2100002


Montessa_Python
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  Message To: Ammeratsu   In reference to Message Id: 2099985


 I Need Help!

I would start off on the ground... and do some flexing exercersizes, you need her to flex her neck/head to her side, where your knee or foot would be.. ON both sides. doing it over and over..
Then get her to turn with her head touching her side and get her to move her back feet, to the side, stepping over one foot/leg.
Both ways, consistantly.. You may be able to do this with out riding, so doing it this week may be a good idea..
The one rein stop, getting the horse to turn its head and moving its hind end, disengages the hind end, AND prevents the horse from going forward..
Once you have the horse doing on the ground.. work at doing it the walk then trot... flexing the neck both ways.. look up clinton anderson, he does a LOT of that.. and it works...
If the horse’s hind end is disengaged... it can’t go forward.
IT works great, I taught my hubby that after his mare spooked. And am working two horses for a client that way so it is installed so that the beginner riders have an emergency brake.

Link
Link
Link

written explainations
Link
Link

Hope this helps
Carol



11/29/09  08:07pm

 #2100042


JENOVA
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  Message To: Ammeratsu   In reference to Message Id: 2099439


 I Need Help!

Not sure if it’s the same, but this technique worked for me when a green mini took off with me in the cart.

When I was driving the mini I’m currently training (Galaxy), He spooked and took off cantering (and bucking) in the cart. No matter what I did: Pulling back in the reins, popping with one rein or the other (a driving technique since we can’t exactly pull them around in a circle with the cart attached) he just wouldn’t stop. It almost felt like he had a hold of the bit and wouldn’t let go or something.

So I did what my instructor always told me to do if I ever got into that situation:

"Aim him straight for the wall, don’t let him turn, and when he pauses to think about where to go next that’s when you can haul down on the reins to stop him."

so that’s what I did. I picked a spot on the wall and didn’t take my eyes off it. I steered straight for it and through a combination of watching his body language and feeling his mouth with the reins I saw the exact moment where he paused to think about what to do next and hauled him down to a walk. They’re not dumb enough to run into the wall in most cases.


This works with driving horses but I don’t know if this is a riding technique or not. I"m sure someone will let me know if it’s not lol



11/29/09  10:36pm

 #2100060


Ammeratsu
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  Message To: JENOVA   In reference to Message Id: 2100042


 I Need Help!

I thought about doing the one-rein stop, but I was nervous it would throw her off balance and cause her to fall. I hadn’t practiced it with her. Is there a danger of throwing her off balance if she’s galloping and I do the one-rein stop?

As for aiming for the wall, I don’t know about that. The only problem I see with that is if she decides to run until the very split second before she hits the wall(she likes to do this in turn-outs), I’d probably just get catapulted over the fence. xDD Anyone can correct me if I’m wrong. It just seems like that would happen when going from 12 mph to 0 in a split second.



11/29/09  11:34pm

 #2100134


JENOVA
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  Message To: Ammeratsu   In reference to Message Id: 2100060


 I Need Help!

Quote:

I’d probably just get catapulted over the fence. xDD Anyone can correct me if I’m wrong. It just seems like that would happen when going from 12 mph to 0 in a split second.



lol that’s why I said I wasn’t too sure if it would work for riding. In the cart I’ve got something to brace against so I can’t really get thrown (unless the cart tips, in which case both me and the horse are screwed anyway).

If you’re ready for the stop with your weight in your seat you would probably be able to stick it. However if you’re off balance NEVER try this because you’d probably go off.

Another problem I see is this horse jumps right? Would she jump the fence? With this technique I’d also be concerned with accidentally teaching her to refuse jumps.




Now that I think about it, just don’t try this one
Sorry ><



11/30/09  11:43am

 #2100239


Montessa_Python
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  Message To: JENOVA   In reference to Message Id: 2100134


 I Need Help!

As I said,
do it on the ground first. You can use treats to get her to start flexing back and forth, either side.. to get her to really flex, AND also on the ground, you can start getting her to disengage her hind end...
Sort of like getting her to spin.. but only a few steps..
Once you are getting her to flex her neck, left and right sides, then add the disengagement.
Hold her head and push on her side/hip to where she moves her back legs to the side..
Then release the pressure.. give her a treat and pats.
Do the same with the other side and get it down pat!!
Then do it at a stand still in an arena, flex the head/neck left, right.. left/right...
Then add the disengagement, flex head/neck and as the head is coming to your knee or foot, add pressure to her side, and get her to move her hind end a bit..
Then do it at the walk, till you get it down pat...
IT is a great tool and training a horse to do that, is installing an emergency brake.



11/30/09  05:50pm

 #2100248


Ammeratsu
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  Message To: Montessa_Python   In reference to Message Id: 2100239


 I Need Help!

That’s true. She does jump. But I don’t think she would jump 5 foot. The highest she’s ever jumped is 3’6’’. I also don’t think this would teach her to refuse. This horse is amazingly honest. She hasn’t EVER refused a jump, even when my instructor was training her from scratch. But I agree. This would probably be dangerous in riding.

And Montessa_Pythong, thanks you so much for your help. I’ll start working with her on the ground and then under saddle. I think this will definitley raise my confidence when riding to know I have a sort of emergency breaks.



11/30/09  06:04pm


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