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Ballmonkey7   Coondog   Shiftylarry   LoKiUSMC   Silverbinder  
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 #1756617


Ballmonkey7
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 How illegal

if u have a Gila monster in California witch i think is illegal. how much of a fine will they give u?[with a license]



06/10/08  04:26am

 #1757370


Coondog
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  Message To: Ballmonkey7   In reference to Message Id: 1756617


 How illegal

If you have a license or permit, then it would not be illegal. The question is, do they give out licenses or permits and that is something you will have to consult the state and local agencies about.



06/10/08  09:19pm

 #1773861


Shiftylarry
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  Message To: Coondog   In reference to Message Id: 1757370


 How illegal

It is extremely rare for someone to get a permit for a Gila in CA. If you do get one, your facilities must first be overlooked and then you are subject to unannounced visits by fish and wild life to determine if your facilities are still up to par. If they see something they don’t like, you are subject to large fines and you will likely lose you animals.



06/25/08  11:52pm

 #1875008


LoKiUSMC
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  Message To: Coondog   In reference to Message Id: 1757370


 How illegal

Quote:

If you have a license or permit, then it would not be illegal. The question is, do they give out licenses or permits and that is something you will have to consult the state and local agencies about.



From a payphone lol



10/04/08  10:22pm

 #1924241


Silverbinder
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  Message To: LoKiUSMC   In reference to Message Id: 1875008


 How illegal

Report from the WAZA

The species is fairly common in at least some parts of the range, but never very abundant. The total adult population size is unknown but is probably at least several thousand. Nevertheless the populations are declining over most of the United States range due to illegal exploitation by commercial and private collectors as well as habitat destruction due to urbanization and agricultural development. The Gila monster is legally protected in all states in which it is found however it is killed quite often, because it is poisonous.
Zoo population 365 reported to ISIS (2007)

Gila Monsters and Beaded lizards are common in captive collections. In the 1960’s it was common practice to drive into Mexico, collect reptiles and amphibians for a week or so, then stop by any of several reptile dealers and buy as many Beaded lizards and Gila Monsters you wanted for about $20 US each. There were no laws at that time. You just declared your cargo at the USA-Mexican border, then took them home (I lived in the USA-California). Some of the Beaded lizards in my collection were purchased as young adults in 1970 and are still healthy and producing babies. They have a 30 year plus lifespan. Considering the large number of both Beaded lizards and Gila Monsters in captivity, there has been very little captive reproduction. In recent years these numbers are improving with the private interest in herpetoculture and the institutional emphasis on captive reproduction. There is now a North American Regional Beaded Lizard Studbook organized to list where various animals are held, and to coordinate breeding efforts. This group is also coordinating some mitochondrial DNA testing to determine which animals are from the same DNA groups. The results are not complete, but this will probably result in a revision of the subspecies of horridum.

Gila Monsters and Beaded lizards are protected in all parts of their range by law. There are legal captive bred specimens available from breeders, but permits are required to take any from the wild. Be careful who you buy from. I know of one example where several Gilas were wild collected and smuggled out of Arizona, and offered as captive hatched animals. One animal had been found on the road with a damaged eye, probably hit by a glancing blow by a passing auto. The smuggler did not charge the receiving dealer for that animal because the extent of the injury was not known and they thought the animal may die. The animal survived and later the dealer made up a story of how the animal had been stepped on while on his animal room floor, to explain the bad eye and was sold as captive hatched! There are other instances where authorities under cover will offer Gilas as wild caught, then later arrest the buyer for purchasing the animals. In one case the authorities broke the leg of the Gila so they could make a positive identification ofthat animal later when the new owner was arrested.




01/01/09  05:36am


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