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Mexicanmonkeyman   KrazyKelli   Mexicanmonkeyman   KrazyKelli  

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 #2303386


Mexicanmonkeyman
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 Old age?

Hi, I have had a golden gecko for about six or seven years now. I’m not sure how old he was when I rescued him from a horribly taken care of home. The previous owner had him in a 50 gallon tank living with two alligator lizards, a blue belly, and a scorpion all of which (excluding the goldie) were wild caught animals. I took him home with me and did a lot of reading and research and he has thrived until a few months ago. He has recently stopped showing any interest in food, he hardly climbs anymore and he spends most of the time on the floor of his terrarium under his hut which is very odd behavior for any goldie. I haven’t changed anything about his home or schedule in years. The only thing I can think of is that he may just be getting old and getting ready to die, however he is my first reptile and I don’t know how they behave at late stages of life. I just want to cover all my bases and make sure there was nothing I could have done to upset him. Also if he is giving up, how can I make him as comfortable as possible?



02/04/14  04:45pm

 #2303388


KrazyKelli
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  Message To: Mexicanmonkeyman   In reference to Message Id: 2303386


 Old age?

Have you gone to a vet yet? Most golden geckos are ripped from the wild over in Vietnam, and being previously housed with all the other creatures I could imagine he’s being overrun with parasites. The vet can provide dewormers for you to administer.

Usually something’s gotta be wrong for a goldie to stick to the bottom of the tank at all times. That or the tank humidity is way down. Occasionally adult lizards go into a brumation, which is a sort of lizard hibernation with less food and activity, but I’ve never had it happen to my goldie and, since they live in semi-tropic regions naturally, I can’t see it in their natural survival mechanisms.

The last time my golden gecko acted that way was when I first got him, and it was coccidia, hookworm, and pinworm in atrocious amounts. Had to deworm him, then forcefeed him for two months and after he recovered he was back to normal.


Golden geckos typically live to be 10 to 13 years old. Not going to factor out old age.



02/04/14  05:23pm

 #2303400


Mexicanmonkeyman
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  Message To: KrazyKelli   In reference to Message Id: 2303388


 Old age?

It had crossed my mind that it could be worms but the thing keeping me from that conclusion is that he has been in his own enclosure for more than half a decade without issues. I don’t know how he could have gotten worms if he didn’t have them already. In the case that he did have them already, could he have not shown any symptoms for so many years? I will probably get a fecal sample looked at the next time he poops just to be safe, however with him not eating I don’t know how I’m going to collect a sample. Is there an other way to have him checked for worms? The nearest vet that specializes in reptiles is more than 100 miles away so I wouldn’t think that transporting him that far is much of an option...
As far as humidity goes, I haven’t changed my habits with his spritzing in a very long time and again, he is just recently acting funny. I spray him when I wake up in the morning and when I go to bed. Occasionally when I get home from work. I also fill his water dish with hot water once a day in the winter time for the extra condensation cause I have to use a larger light to keep him warm enough during this time of the year.
In any case, thanks for helping me to figure this out.



02/04/14  11:17pm

 #2303403


KrazyKelli
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  Message To: Mexicanmonkeyman   In reference to Message Id: 2303400


 Old age?

A lizard can harbor a problem for the longest of times without showing any outside stress. It’s how they survive in the wild, by not looking weak. When a lizard starts acting weird or behaving weakly, they’ve transcended beyond a simple problem and are literally so bad they can’t hide it anymore. The food you give can also give parasites at random, such as crickets. Pinworm is the most common one.

Vets have a magic touch when it comes to getting crap out of a lizard. However golden geckos love crapping on you in self defense when you grab them. Try that out first. Store the crap on a q-tip in a ziplock bag. If you have to transport him, get one of those cardboard small-animal boxes at petsmart, a critter tote, a towel, and a heat pack. Put the lizard in the tote with some moist papertowel, then line the cardboard box with the towel (can be warmed in the dryer beforehand if it’s cold out). Put the heatpack under the towel on one end, and the critter tote over the towel on the other. Close the box and the lizard should do fine for the trip.

Pet stores sometimes have a vet nearby or on staff. Zoos also have a reptile vet, if you have one somewhere in the area. So you can look at alternative options.



02/04/14  11:54pm


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