Your Reptile and Amphibian Resource and Information Site

Frogs Forum

Click Here To Register and Become A Member Of The RepticZone Family  

Back to Frogs Forum   Forums   Home   Members Area  

Chloedog   Takahiro111   Crotus  

 Member  Message

 #2311657


Chloedog
View Profile





 Fighting Fire Bellied Toads

Last week I got two fire bellied toads. They were fine with each other for the first couple of days but then not so much. On the third day I was feeding them crickets (I put in four crickets). I noticed that the bigger one was hanging back in the water while the smaller one went and ate the crickets. Then, even though the bigger fire bellied toad had not even moved toward a cricket, the smaller one came over and bit him! It just went up and put the entire head of the bigger one in its mouth!
I thought that I had a male and female, the bigger one being male and the smaller being female because the bigger one mounted the smaller one on the first day. But now I’m wondering if this is just two males fighting. The next day, I put some crickets in for them and the larger fire bellied toad didn’t even move toward them, it’s like he is scared at this point. I tried separating the larger one out so that it could have food by itself but in moving them around I just stressed them out too much to eat.
I tried feeding them mealworms (I know some people say that mealworms and superworms can be dangerous to feed but I found a science journal about a series of experiments that tested that myth and showed that unless there’s a severe problem, like a predator harming the stomach lining, mealworms and superworms cannot chew out of the stomach and actually become, for lack of better word, paralyzed after about 30 seconds in the stomach) in two separate bowls yesterday and it worked until the smaller one sort of attacked afterwards. They each had had two meal worms, which some people say is even overfeeding! Today I added more crickets, about six (maybe a couple more than that, not quite sure) But the larger toad just stayed in the water again while the smaller one ate. I took one of the crickets and put it in the water next to the bigger fire bellied toad and he ate it, but this isn’t very efficient and I’m sure its not very healthy for the fire bellied toads for me to be handling their food this much.
This is really strange to me, I seriously thought that the bigger one might bully around the smaller one, but it’s the other way around! One explanation I’ve come up with is that the bigger one is already an adult while the smaller is still a juvenile. Some people recommend feeding juveniles every day and adults every other day or even every third day. Could that be it? Could I just be overfeeding the "adult"?
I don’t see any injuries on the larger frog, and he swims and moves around pretty well, so I don’t think that he is not eating because of an injury. They are in a twenty five gallon tank composed 50 50 of water and land, so I wouldn’t think that territory conflicts would be that much of a problem between just two of the amphibians which, according to National Geographic, are supposed to live together even in the wild.
Any suggestions?



01/04/15  08:54pm

 #2311724


Takahiro111
View Profile



  Message To: Chloedog   In reference to Message Id: 2311657


 Fighting Fire Bellied Toads

Seperate them....this is the first of me hearin a little one being the bully. You may have to males, they can live together in the wild because if one feels threathen he can escape but the big one cannot in this tank. You’ll need a different tank to house the juvenile.



01/09/15  02:45am

 #2312011


Crotus
View Profile



  Message To: Chloedog   In reference to Message Id: 2311657


 Fighting Fire Bellied Toads

I think the smaller one probably was very hungry... If you try to keep them both well fed then they should be content and not bother each other too much, because these toads like to live in groups. If fighting continues to be a problem however, try providing some visual barriers like rocks, plants, etc to make it easier to feed them separately even though they are in the same tank. Btw it’s best to avoid mealworms and try to stick to soft-bodied insects. Speaking of that, in my experience despite their small size these toads are able to take on even large crickets, but the ones with the wings can be nasty and sharp-legged so just feed them medium, wingless crickets.



01/22/15  02:34pm


Back to Frogs Forum   Forums   Home   Members Area