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Reptictale92   Rae rae   Reptictale92   Removed By System  

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 #2246925


Reptictale92
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 To be clear!!

We all know that the pitbull came to by breeding a mastiff an a bulldog, but me doing more studying found out it was COMMON for people to mistake the bulldogs history for the pitbulls history. Let me set you straight.

Quote:

The name "bulldog" was first mentioned in print in 1631. Later, dogs described as bulldogs were used to bait bull and bear. These bulldogs are most assuredly the descendants of the Alaunt. A letter written in Spain in 1632 by an Englishman named Prestwich Eaton to his friend George Wellingham who was in London, asked for a "good mastiff dog and two bulldogs." This gives indication that a split had occurred and the bulldog had already formed into a distinct type by this time.

That is a description of the photo which we all thought pitbulls were used as bait dogs well you are WRONG.

Quote:

Bulldogs were one of the breeds used to create the modern APBT. Bulldog history is often mistakenly applied to Pit Bulls.

Another fact from the article I read.

Quote:

Bulldogs were used for all manner of work including baiting, fighting, stock work, and farm dog, as well as companion animal. They were an agreeable dog, capable of extreme ferociousness towards other animals but unwavering loyalty and gentleness towards humans. They were a breed which was required to demonstrate a certain level of aggression directed towards other animals, but were routinely used in pairs to bait animals, so overt aggression towards others of their same species was
not an extreme trait.

Another fact.

Quote:

Bulldogs with a heightened tendency to exhibit dog-directed aggression, a smaller size, and greater agility for performance in a pit that was decidedly smaller than the large areas that baits were typically held in were the likely candidates. Hardy, scrappy sporting terriers were crossed into these fighting bulldogs to further enhance these traits. The crosses were called bull-and-terriers. It is considered general knowledge that these crosses were the first Pit Bulls, however there is some speculation as to whether or not the history of these crosses is that of our Pit Bulls, or rather a history "borrowed" from the Bull Terrier, which is a very well documented bulldog/terrier fighting dog cross. Some students of Pit Bull history believe that the Pit Bull is practically a living replica of the old-time bulldog, and that during this time the bulldog was refined as a fighting dog ‘as is’, without any
crossbreeding. The question presented is this: why would the devotees of the already extremely game bulldog dilute the blood of the perfect fighting dog with non-game terriers? The typical argument is that the terrier blood increased agility and decreased size. However, the jobs the bulldog was typically required to perform would have demanded agility and the ability to avoid the antics of an enraged bull. As already pointed out, bulldogs came in a variety of sizes and shapes, so breeding down the size to be
more compatible with the pit would not have been a difficult task, even without looking outside the gene pool. Examining works of art from all points in history, one will discover dogs that look similar to today’s Pit Bull.

More facts.

Quote:

The breed eventually to be known as the American Pit Bull Terrier was selectively bred specifically with the idea of it becoming the ultimate canine gladiator. But by virtue of the fact that so much of the breed was made up of versatile bulldog blood, the breed also proved adept at a number of non-fighting activities, including those which the bulldog had been used for. Also, the traits (specifically gameness and a soft, gentle, amiable temperament with humans) bred for in pit dogs were surprisingly
relevant in other arenas. Gameness is defined as the willingness to see a ask through to its end, even under penalty of serious injury or death. Gameness was the trait most cherished in a fighting dog for obvious reasons, however this same trait proved useful in other areas - a dog who had the tenacity to hold a wild bull or boar, braveness to keep wild and stray animals away from valuable livestock, and extreme tolerance for pain (which made for a very stable dog less likely to bite out of fear or
pain) was useful in rural old England, and later on in America. So while a core group of fanciers focused on the fighting uses of the breed, and bred with the pit in mind, others kept dogs for a variety of tasks. And indeed, some family/working dogs were used in the pit and some pit dogs were alsofamily/working dogs. There was never a clear line drawn between ‘fighting dogs’, and ‘non-fighting dogs’ in those early years of the breed.

. More facts.

If you want to read more go to this website to all who say pitbulls were breed for fighting in better words yall are stupid. http://www.realpitbull. com/history2.htm


12/12/11  01:32AM

 #2247112


Rae rae
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  Message To: Reptictale92   In reference to Message Id: 2246925


 To be clear!!

When I did a research paper on Pit Bulls in college what I found is that bull baiting became illegal in the 1800s. So instead of that sport, people had to find a different one. What I read was that people then combined this bulldog with some kind of terrier to create the Pit. Pit bulls were then selectively bred for their affection towards people. Because their owners had to be in the pit with the fighting dogs, if a dog showed any aggression towards people it was killed and that bloodline was not bred. So affection towards people was definitely bred into them...and I think that’s what makes them such good dogs! Some of this info may be wrong...but this is just the research that I found through internet, magazine articles, etc. I could be wrong, but never in my studies did I ever see where a mastiff was in the mix. Of course most of the research I did stated that nobody really knows exactly what was mixed in to make the Pit Bull Terrier. I just know they are my favorite breed lol!

12/14/11  01:17AM

 #2247117


Reptictale92
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  Message To: Rae rae   In reference to Message Id: 2247112


 To be clear!!

I did my research as well an I learned a few things that I didn’t know an proved myself wrong on a few things. Back in 1800’s there was no line of a fighting dog of non-fighting dog. It was either a work dog or family or like the pit bull both. From what I read an believe me I non stop till I read the same thing over an over again pit bulls are dogs that do what we train them to do or teach them. We (as in men) taught them to fight an that’s what they did cause it made certain morons happy. No other dog has that drive. A pit bull will do anything we teach them an like anything in the wrong hands it can be turned up side down. Its not the pit bull cause I believe they are the bred that people back in 1700’s said this is the dog. I love the pit bulls an I will fight for them to show people they are not what these morons show them to be.

12/14/11  02:11AM

 #2247119


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  Message To: Reptictale92   In reference to Message Id: 2247117


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12/14/11  02:26AM


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