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 #2175416


Venom6547
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 What is Parvo ?

I’d like to know what it is because I have heard there is an outbreak of it in my area and now my dog is acting weird she was really sick and it was black and sorta greenish goop that didnt really smell but now it smells like bleach a little and like a week ago i read on craigslist that some lady’s dog died after it was sick sorta like that and now....well now i am starting to worry because shes never been sick like this before and is there a cure to parvo?? please help i love my dog and dont want to lose her over something i can prevent



09/14/10  10:12am

 #2175435


Johnkorz
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  Message To: Venom6547   In reference to Message Id: 2175416


 What is Parvo ?

I’d get her to the vet asap! Or at least call them and ask to talk to the vet.
Parvo can kill a dog but it can be treated (not guaranteed though.)
Google it online. I thought it affected young dogs (two years or less) but I might be wrong.
Good luck!


A guy at work almost lost his dog recently because he waited too long to find out that it had some kind of virus that was cured with meds.



09/14/10  11:39am

 #2175438


Venom6547
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  Message To: Johnkorz   In reference to Message Id: 2175435


 What is Parvo ?

Yeah I’m going to but should my dog act any differently ? i mean shes calmer but still every so often she gets hyper and she drinks a lot of water, should i expect her to act differently or what? i’ve looked up things about it and there wasnt much other than how fast it kills



09/14/10  11:48am

 #2175455


Johnkorz
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  Message To: Venom6547   In reference to Message Id: 2175438


 What is Parvo ?

Have you seen these sites?
http://www.parvoindogs.com/
http://vetmedicine.about.com/cs/dognz/a/parvodog.htm
Again, good luck.



09/14/10  02:55pm

 #2175527


ReptileRodent
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  Message To: Venom6547   In reference to Message Id: 2175416


 What is Parvo ?

The only way to know for sure if your dog has Parvo is to have your Vet draw blood and run a Parvo Test (It takes ten minutes).Your dog will need to be kept in a Vet clinic for awhile if she has Parvo. A dog with Parvo has to be put on IV Fluids for the best chances of survival. It is the vomiting and diarrhea that can kill the dog, because they become dehydrated. Your vet will isolate your dog from others (It is VERY contagious), and then keep it on fluids and anti-vomiting pills. It is a MUST that you take her to your Vet if you suspect something is wrong, Parvo can NOT be treated properly at home.

Good luck, and please keep us updated!



09/14/10  11:43pm

 #2175580


ShadowAceD
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  Message To: ReptileRodent   In reference to Message Id: 2175527


 What is Parvo ?

Is your dog vaccinated against parvo? They can still get it sometimes with it, but it’s not as common. In high risk areas, dogs need to have the yearly parvo shot. Not the three year.

Like everyone said, it needs to go to the vet for the best chance.

As for it being impossible to treat properly at home, that’s not true. I’ve known people to have dogs survive parvo without getting the treatment from the vet either due to financial issues or, in one case, not having a vet available for three days due to being in an isolated town during a holiday. It’s diffcult, yes, but not completely impossible.

I’m not saying try to self treat if you can get it to the vet and afford it, but parvo treatment is very expensive and even that is not a guarantee.



09/15/10  11:00am

 #2175622


Venom6547
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  Message To: ShadowAceD   In reference to Message Id: 2175580


 What is Parvo ?

Well actually she seems alot better today, when i got home from school she came running out of the house with a tennis ball and chased after it when i threw it so i guess i just got really worried knowing about the parvo and how hse got sick like she was. but thank you very much for all your help with link and whatnot i now know what to do if i ever suspect something like that again. thanks



09/15/10  03:24pm

 #2175651


Johnkorz
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  Message To: Venom6547   In reference to Message Id: 2175622


 What is Parvo ?

Great! Glad to hear she’s doing better. Could have been just a 24 hour flu type of thing.



09/15/10  08:38pm

 #2175679


ReptileRodent
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  Message To: Johnkorz   In reference to Message Id: 2175651


 What is Parvo ?

That is great to hear! It doesn’t sound like she has/had Parvo to me. I still stand with the fact that Parvo can’t be treated PROPERLY at home. It is way too contagious to be taken lightly, and is a HUGE killer in puppies. Yes it CAN be treated at home, but it is definitely not in the best interest of the dog, or any other puppy that may come into contact with the dog while it was sick whether from direct or indirect contact.



09/15/10  10:36pm

 #2175983


Keirax
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  Message To: Venom6547   In reference to Message Id: 2175416


 What is Parvo ?

glad to hear your dog is doing ok. to answer your question and so you can tell in the future here is some info on the parvo virus hope it helps:

Canine parvovirus is the most common serious infectious disease of dogs in the United States. Canine parvovirus causes ulcerative enteritis and diarrhea in susceptible dogs. This diarrhea can be bloody and life threatening. The parvovirus has mutated several times since 1980. The most common strain today is CPV-2B.
The high mortalities of the 1970s and 1980’s have lessened due to effective vaccines. Still, some dogs continue to break with the disease and die despite vaccination.

Dynamics Of The Disease
Parvovirus is an extremely tough and resistant bug. The virus lives for long periods of time on floors, food containers and other household objects. Rugs are particularly difficult to sanitize. It is thought that household vermin such as cockroaches move the virus from place to place. The virus is both resistant to phenolic disinfectants and to heat. It can be inactivated, however, with ordinary household bleach used at a concentration of one part bleach to twenty parts water. Exposure to sunshine also kills the virus. For the bleach solution to work, any caked organic material must first be removed by washing.

Although it takes one or two weeks for the dog to develop signs of disease, the virus is shed in the feces from the third day of exposure onward. This means that dogs that appear healthy can already be shedding the virus and contaminating the home.

The Symptoms of Parvo
Parvovirus disease is remarkable in that symptoms can vary from none at all to a fatal disease. Four factors govern the severity of the disease: age at exposure, the size of the virus dose, the presence of maternal antibody, and the breed of dog involved.
Dogs receive transient maternal antibody from their mothers through their first milk or colostrum. This antibody gives the puppy resistance to the disease. Puppies that are housed in a parvo-filled environment rarely break with the disease until they reach 14-20 weeks of age. At that time their mother’s immunity no longer protects them and they may die of the disease.
Dogs over six month of age develop natural resistance to the effects of parvovirus. Many of these dogs show only transient diarrhea. By the time the dog reaches one or two years of age the disease can be so mild that it passes unnoticed by the owners.
For unknown reasons, Doberman Pinschers, Rottweilers and Pit Bull Terriers become more ill with this disease than other breeds.

The most common form of parvovirus infection is a sudden (acute) inflammation of the small intestine or enteritis. This is characterized by depression, vomiting, diarrhea and profound dehydration. Bloody stools and a drop in white blood cell numbers are common. Some puppies die as soon as diarrhea occurs but many linger on for 4-6 days. Those that survive eight days usually recover. The lack of white blood cells and ulceration of the lining of the small intestine lead to secondary bacterial infections. There are many other virus and bacteria that can cause bloody diarrhea in dogs. This leads to misdiagnosis where not all cases of “Parvo” in puppies and adults are actually due to this virus.

Diagnosis
Although symptoms can be very suggestive of Parvo, true diagnosis requires an antibody test that detects the actual parvovirus in stool samples. The test is an ELISA test or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Early in the disease, this test can be negative. Virus isolation is possible but the procedure is quite expensive and rarely done. In practice, the presence of an acute hemorrhagic diarrhea is usually all that is required for a tentative diagnosis of parvovirus.

Treatment
Treatment of parvovirus is directed at correcting the life-threatening dehydration that accompanies the diarrhea with intravenous fluids (lactated ringers solution with bicarbonate). Ten to forty milliliters per pound is given initially and then a slow intravenous drip may stabilize these dogs. Once the initial dehydration is corrected, maintenance fluids can also be given subcutaneously. We also give medicines that relax intestinal spasms such as metoclopramide (Reglan, 0.1-0.25mg/lb three or four times a day) and trimethobenzamide (Tigan, 1.5mg/lb three times a day). Besides this, the dogs are placed on antibiotics to prevent secondary bacterial infection through the damaged small intestine (cephalothin, Keflin @ 5-15mg/pound given four times a day intramuscularly or intravenously). Early in the disease dogs may run a short period of fever. But puppies’ temperatures often drop to subnormal a few days later. These dogs need additional sources of heat. It helps to sit with the dog, pet it and encourage its will to live. Many of the younger dogs have hookworm infestations that make the parvovirus disease more severe. As soon as these dogs can hold down liquids, I worm them with pyrantel pamoate (Strongid, Nemex, 2.5mg/pound).
Some veterinarians give the dogs small doses of butorphanol tartrate (Torbugesic 0.05-0.1mg/pound intramuscularly) to relieve the severe abdominal pain that accompanies this disease.
Dogs and puppies that begin to accept small portions of food invariably are on the road to recovery. Wagging their tail is also a good sign. Despite all my efforts, many young dogs with parvo do not survive.

Immunity To The Disease
Recovered dogs are probably immune for life. Because of the strong immunity that follows infection, carrier dogs do not exist.
Many excellent brands of vaccine are on the market. Most contain living, attenuated (weakened) parvovirus. All products are safe and produce good immunity when the last injection is given at 18 weeks of age. When a vaccine fails it is usually because it was given to a puppy before enough passive maternal antibody was gone from its blood stream. At six weeks of age one quarter of puppies can be immunized successfully. At nine weeks of age forty percent of puppies can be immunized successfully. By sixteen weeks sixty percent of puppies can be immunized successfully and by eighteen weeks ninety-five percent of puppies can be immunized successfully. Some newer vaccines called high titer-low passage vaccines are successful in immunizing puppies at an earlier age (12wks). Antibody level testing is quite expensive. Rather than measuring antibody levels in the blood of puppies in order to choose the right age to administer the vaccine, we give a series of shots designed to successfully immunize most puppies before they come in contact with the virus while susceptible.
I give parvo vaccine at 12, 14 and 18 weeks of age. When I see puppies at 9 weeks of age I may also vaccinate them. This “puppy shot series” causes us to vaccinate some puppies that are not ready to respond to the vaccine and to re-vaccinate some puppies that are already immune to the disease. It is also possible for some susceptible puppies to “slip through” these periodic vaccinations and be susceptible to parvo for a period of days. These are the unfortunate dogs that develop parvo despite vaccination.


Conclusion
Parvovirus is still a major threat to dogs in the United States and a common cause of mortality in puppies. Due to the resistance of the virus to antiseptics, heat and drying it is impossible to manage a kennel to be 100% safe from this disease. No matter what puppy vaccination schedule is used, there will be a window of susceptibility when puppies are at risk of disease if exposure occurs. Rapid veterinary care can save many infected dogs but some will die from the disease despite excellent care.



09/18/10  01:21am

 #2176096


Johnkorz
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  Message To: Keirax   In reference to Message Id: 2175983


 What is Parvo ?

Wow! Now THAT answers your question! Awesome!



09/18/10  04:47pm

 #2176105


Keirax
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  Message To: Johnkorz   In reference to Message Id: 2176096


 What is Parvo ?

lol thank you i just wanted to give the information i could to help educate and possibly help save a dogs life :D



09/18/10  05:28pm

 #2176114


Johnkorz
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  Message To: Keirax   In reference to Message Id: 2176105


 What is Parvo ?

Yeah, I’m feeling you on that but I had trouble getting good info coverage on the Internet, Where’d you get all that?



09/18/10  06:30pm

 #2176156


Keirax
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  Message To: Johnkorz   In reference to Message Id: 2176114


 What is Parvo ?

http://www.2ndchance.info/parvo.htm



09/18/10  10:01pm


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