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 #2132583


Goldysgirl76
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 "Excitement Urination"???

Ok so here’s my question, I’ve had dogs before and I’ve never encountered this issue before. I have a 10 month Old A.P.B.T Male his name is "Felon". We’ve had him since he was 9wks. He trained fairly quickly at around 12wks, he was accident free indoors. Except that whenever we (the family without the dog) go out of the house for a bit and return, Felon always greets us by sprinkling on the carpet, then retreating to his kennel (almost as if he knows he’s done something he shouldn’t have). He also does this when we have visitors as soon as they make eye contact or he sees them he immediately sprinkles wherever he is on the couch or carpet, then the whole retreat thing again. And finally whenever myself or my kids "baby talk" to him in a high pitch voice and pet him he also repeats this process. We have tried everything from not paying him attention when we enter to kenneling him when we expect visitors even trying not to give him tooo much attention this seems like a temporary fix but truly it sucks. I hate to kennel him and I love to give him attention and to greet him when I’ve missed him all day.. So how can I help end this habit (if it is one). Why does he do it? Will he grow out of it? Does he maybe need Vet assistance? Please help. All advice, opinions, and acknowledgement will be happily welcome. Thanks in Advance. Oh by the way this is my "lil Sprinkler"



03/13/10  06:12pm

 #2132596


Ammeratsu
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  Message To: Goldysgirl76   In reference to Message Id: 2132583


 "Excitement Urination"???

I don’t have an answer, but I’m interested to know why also. Rikka and her daughter do it, and it’s usually right when we come home. They’ll just get excited(or scared) and pee a little.



03/13/10  06:34pm

 #2132600


KrazyKelli
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  Message To: Goldysgirl76   In reference to Message Id: 2132583


 "Excitement Urination"???

There’s a chance that he’s afraid and being overly submissive. If a dog is being dominated and is either afraid of the other dog or naturally timid, they will not only lay down and expose their belly, but urinate. It’s a means of communication for dogs. Scared _less, as the term loosely goes. He could also simply be young and have a weak bladder, so when something excites him he lets loose.

My corgi use to do this, and still on a blue moon does if he comes across a huge dog. But he gradually grew out of it as he became more confident of his surroundings.

You are prompted to do one of three things.

1. Seek a vet over the issue. Make sure it’s not something like a case of parasites or a bacterial infection in the bladder (which can happen to young dogs that get into everything). If this continues after step two and three, you can also always consider medication to help him get over his problem of either being too afraid or too excited.

2. Expose him to many situations and places, see other dogs, invite many people over, and train him yourself to be more confident. You don’t have to be jumping around screaming like a fool, you just have to show him the world. So long as you are calm and confident and/or melo, he should get the hint that it’s not nearly as scary. Give him a walk for fourty minutes every day, and try to keep him too busy to be upset into wetting himself. Don’t yell, freak out, or use an overly strong voice in his presence.

3. Do nothing and see if he grows out of it. Though I don’t know about you, but I’d be absolutely pissed if a dog pissed on my couch.


You should also be taking him out _ amount of times a day; preferably after meals, before you leave the house, and before anyone new shows up. That can empty him and reduce the problem. Another option is restricting his water intake, though I think this is cruel and unjust.



03/13/10  06:51pm

 #2132658


Goldysgirl76
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  Message To: KrazyKelli   In reference to Message Id: 2132600


 "Excitement Urination"???

Yeah as far as him peeing on the couch I would be pretty pissed except its an old patent leather couch so its more for his use and its easily cleaned up he is not allowed on "Our" furniture which is why he has his own lol.. And yeah he also does it whenever he is with another dog whether smaller or bigger than him he pees all over them I get so embarrassed.. But I’m taking him out around 5-6 times a day sometimes more but he’ll even do it right after he comes in if my kids are overly attentive to him and do there "goodboy" routine with lots of hugs & kisses.. So I don’t think he does it from not going out enough.. But I believe you are right he needs more socialization that may help thank you.. But I might also check with my Vet.



03/13/10  10:01pm

 #2132749


KrazyKelli
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  Message To: Goldysgirl76   In reference to Message Id: 2132658


 "Excitement Urination"???

I forgot to bring this up before, and only do this once you see a vet and rule out other ailments that may cause the urination:

A good way to keep the dog’s head out of anxiety, and this is especially effective for work dogs, is to put it in work mode the second anyone enters the house. You can start with a simple sit and stay. If you are persistent and never give in to his running off and hiding, even if he loses his bladder all the freaking time in the beginning, he should eventually go from, "LIVING CRAP! SOMEONE IS COMING IN!" to "What does my owner want me to do next?" His urge to sit there, stay there, and please you will override his fear of what comes in the door.

It starts easy enough. You have your dog sit or stay in your foyer or near the back door and invite someone in. Reinforce this with food at first, preferably a smelly treat he’s never had before. If the dog runs off, quietly have the person go back outside, close the door, and invite the dog back over. Make it sit and stay again. Repeat. Once the person is inside, have your dog hold the sitting behavior and have a conversation with the person. When the dog either sits for the duration or when he immediately lays down, praise him. After you get the hang of this, up the anti and have the person carry a bag or invite more than one person in.

Once the idea clicks with the animal, you will notice. The urge to please you (and at first for food) usually wins out.

And the more interested the dog is with your orders and your treats, the less threatened he feels and the less of an urge he will have to communicate with you through his urine.

You can also, if you want less mess, start on your porch or on the grass and try the same tactics there. Person comes up, dog sits there and watches you, dog gets treat. Dog freaks out or tries to run away, no treat and the person stops. Switch people often. Then, once you’re comfortable that the dog understands what you want, you move inside.

From there you can further your motives by keeping the dog in a working mode while people are around your house. Teach the dog to go to or sit in a certain spot, or to stay at your side at all times. After you’re sure that everyone is let in and settled, you can give the dog a release command. "Go off" "You’re free now." something to signify that the dog no longer has to do what you need. If the dog is sufficiently calm, it should go off and lay down somewhere.

You can use similar motives when entering the home. As in, when you enter the house, you come in with a smelly treat. You tell him to back up and sit, then you give him the treat. He’ll eventually be so busy trying to please you for the treat that he’ll forget his anxiety for just a moment.



03/14/10  11:15am

 #2133446


Rae rae
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  Message To: KrazyKelli   In reference to Message Id: 2132749


 "Excitement Urination"???

yea unfortunately this is one of the hardest things for me to deal with. if you overreact to it, it will just make it worse and they will pee more. i believe in the wild, submissive dogs will pee when scared of dominant pack members as to say.."smell this, i’m a puppy, don’t hurt me!" my chihuahua does it all the time with me or anyone that comes over. my male chihuahua doesn’t though. every one of them are different.

maybe try ignoring him for a bit when you first get home. no eye contact, no petting, no acknowledgement. i know that’s hard to do, but it might save your carpet haha! after a bit when he’s calmed down, then show him affection and hopefully the excitement and nervousness has worn off by then. good luck.



03/16/10  08:57pm

 #2133503


Reptilover1
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  Message To: Rae rae   In reference to Message Id: 2133446


 "Excitement Urination"???

Hi.....the Sheltie I had growing up peed every time when we got home. She even did it when she was outside and we would greet her after school. But in her case it was definately excitement. She’d be running around in circles, her tail wagging a million miles an hour, little tongue trying to lick any exposed part of us!!! So we did take her to the vet (who told us it was due to over excitement of seeing us after we had been gone). Eventually she did grow out of it, but it’s hard.... we didn’t worry about it when she was outside, of course. What we did when she was inside - we had newspapers and would only pet her (right when we got home, I mean) when she was on the papers. She was smart and after a while would go right to the papers when we got home. I know it’s not a cure or anything, it’s just how it was managed until she calmed down. I suppose you could use the puppy pads too, but newspapers are MUCH cheaper.........Good luck! LIZ



03/16/10  11:54pm

 #2133671


Cajunlady24
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  Message To: Reptilover1   In reference to Message Id: 2133503


 "Excitement Urination"???

Sounds to me exactly what my male dog used to do. Now he only does it when he knows he has done something wrong and he is trying to get in the kennel. This is we did with him. We keep him locked in his kennel when we aren’t home. Get home and take him out right away. while he is using the bathroom we tell him he is a good boy. Also fast movements towards him would make him pee so we slowed our paste with him. Inside the house I would get a toy and play with him. Get him more comfy with the idea and more used to my more higher pitched voice. (laughing, running, talkin to him,etc.) all of that seemed to work for him. Not saying it will for yours but I know how you feel anything is worth trying.

My entire family didn’t think he was the same dog after having him for 2 months. They talked to him and he would run straight up to them for some loving. Before everything we did he would run and pee everywhere no matter what tone we used. The only differents I can tell you is that our dog had been abused before we got him. He is one of the best dogs I have had. Good luck in what ever method you decide to try. In my case I only tried 3 different ones and luckily the 3rd time was the charm for me and my little guy



03/17/10  05:20pm

 #2133693


Reptilover1
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  Message To: Cajunlady24   In reference to Message Id: 2133671


 "Excitement Urination"???

Oh and see, Michelle (our sheltie) wasn’t abused or anything. we got her at 3 months from a family friend. there was no anxiety with her at all. It was just pure puppy excitement. She would do it even though she was home with mom - then WE would get home (little bro and I) and she’d go nuts :)



03/17/10  06:56pm


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