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 #2225937


JkiddReptiles
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  Is a 40 gallon or 55 gallon good for a pair

Is a 40 gallon or 55 gallon good for a pair of collared lizards? Also can i keep a male and female together when not breeding or do then need their own tanks?



06/20/11  09:53pm

 #2226959


Reptileruler1
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  Message To: JkiddReptiles   In reference to Message Id: 2225937


  Is a 40 gallon or 55 gallon good for a pair

well I prefer a 40 gallon breeder for my collareds because a 55 is 4 ft long an 1 ft wide where as a 40 gallon breeder is 3 ft long and 1 and 1/2 ft wide but either one will work for a pair



06/28/11  07:17pm

 #2227378


JackAsp
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  Message To: Reptileruler1   In reference to Message Id: 2226959


  Is a 40 gallon or 55 gallon good for a pair

I agree. A 55 is built to look bigger to us, not to actually provide land animals with more room.
The 55 has 4 feet of floor space. The 40 has 4.5.
The 55 has a thinner floor with higher glass walls, which means that on a hot day the designated cool areas receive much less ventilation than the 40.
The 40’s extra 6 inches of width offer more extra furniture options than the 55’s 3 inches of height. The 55’s extra 12 inches of length is a choice factor if you’re only talking about individual housing, but with a pair they should have room to pass each other freely without colliding.
Also, narrower cages tend to mean that crickets can hide behind something a lot more quickly.
My real suggestion is a 75, but I admit it’s probably not requred, especially for a CB pair. It worked phenominaly for a CB trio, and when I upgraded them to a larger but otherwise more flawed cage I had nothing but trouble.
I guess, in simplest terms: bearing in mind that colards do not get walked and do not play frisbee...
A pair of collards in a 75 is like a pair of small dogs with a large yard to play in. They might not miss it if they don’t have it, but if they do have it, then neither they nor their owner would have it anyother way. And also, it’s kind of where "reasonable cheap moveable tanks that still look decent" tends to taper off. Go bigger and you’re usually talking three digits for a cracked piece of junk that weighs three times as much.
A 40 is like the same pair of small dogs, with a small yard to play in, but it’s a yard that they can do whatever they want in.
A 55 is like if they have a medium-sized yard, but there’s way too much clutter from thorny rosebushes and an old swingset and a fneced-in koi pond, and the only sections that they actually have access to don’t have nearly enough shade...
and since we’re still talking about small dogs, that last yard may still work fine, but it has a lot more isues to overcome than the more dog-friendly smaller one. Or than the doggie Valhala equivalent, aka the 75.



07/02/11  03:46am

 #2227400


JkiddReptiles
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  Message To: JackAsp   In reference to Message Id: 2227378


  Is a 40 gallon or 55 gallon good for a pair

Thanks JackAsp for the advice. You really put things into perspective for me. How much does a 75 gallon tank or 40 tank go for?



07/02/11  12:06pm

 #2227515


JackAsp
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  Message To: JkiddReptiles   In reference to Message Id: 2227400


  Is a 40 gallon or 55 gallon good for a pair

If you shop around the Mom and Pop pet shops and/or Craigslist, a used 75 runs about 75. Then you can shop online and get a cover shipped for a total of about 30 bucks, maybe a little less.. or buy the scren at a pet shop for 40 or 50. You might get lucky and get one with the tank, or get motivated and build your own.
A used 40 would be cheaper, maybe even as low as 30 if it’s sufficiently leaky and scratched, but a new one usually costs at least as much as the used 75. A new 40 breeder comes with a sliding screen, but you won’t like it. Those sliding screens suck. They stick and jam a lot, and they’re built so flimsy that they just get worse and worse. And the animals aren’t big fans of having you smash and cuss and fight with the screen every time you want to open or close it. If you DO try using the original screen for a while, since you’ve paid for it anyway and want to get that indeterminate number of decent months out of it, avoid putting any weight on it. Installing a closet bar above the tank to hang lights from is a good idea anyway. It allows you to raise or lower them to fine-tune your temperatures (as does keeping multiple-wattage light bulbs around to choose from,) plus it makes opening and closing any type of cover much easier on both you and the lizards. But eventually you probably will end up getting a normal removeable screen top for the 40, which costs pretty close to what the top for the 75 does.



07/04/11  01:17am

 #2227803


Reptileruler1
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  Message To: JackAsp   In reference to Message Id: 2227515


  Is a 40 gallon or 55 gallon good for a pair

Also if sand gets into the sliding part it makes the sound like running nails on chalkboard everytime you open it. Also if you want to find the cheapest tanks ask people you know if they have one or are looking to get rid of one I got my 75 gallon my 55 gallon and 1 of my 40 gallons for free from a friend of mine who was going to college. If no one has any then just do what Jackasp said also how are the lizards doing Jackasp having seen you around in awhile.



07/06/11  01:07pm

 #2231366


JackAsp
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  Message To: Reptileruler1   In reference to Message Id: 2227803


  Is a 40 gallon or 55 gallon good for a pair

Yeah, I took a break from the place for a while.
Well, late last year Chica got impacted. All the signs were there, and I tried the usual home remedies, but once her limbs and tail started losing weight I rushed her to the vet. The vet absolutely insisted that the symptoms were amoebic and gave me some meds to use for a week, during which Chica died. So I did a home autopsy and found, you guessed it, an impaction that was so close to the cloaca I don’t even think removing it woud have required cutting! The material responsible was little scratched-off bits from one of those Exa Terra fake rock backgrounds. I didn’t use the background for very long, BECAUSE of that stupid dust which I had to constantly clean up, but apparently while it as in there Chica ate a lot of the stuff, and about six months later it caught up with her.
Then, this year, Lupe’s ovary ruptured, which led to an infection, which destroyed her liver, although as the ovary itself got worse the final cause of death was actually blood loss. Chica’s death may have been related to Lupe’s, since Lupe, demonstrating the lazier side of their communal nesting tendency, liked to hold her eggs in until Chica dug a nice big tunnel, and then she’d join her at the last minute. This year, having to bury the eggs on her own, she may have held them too long. I don’t know. Didn’t even really know about the ovary until after she died. She’d been on antibiotics because her blood cell count made it obvious there was something going on in there, but that didn’t help with the original cause.
So now it’s just the males. I still have Pancho, and since Lupe and Chica were both large, dominant females, Pancho may actually be happier on his own now, since Pancho’s a pretty small male. Both of his adult sons, even the runt of the litter, are bigger than he is. And I still have Cesar and Nino, for completely different reasons. Cesar is just too GOOD to part with! Huge, tame , beautiful blue color, eats anything, plus sentimentality points for being the first egg I ever hatched. And Nino has just never gone quite long enough without some issue or other. I feel safer keeping him where he is. I like Nino as a pet, but not as a contributor to the captive gene pool, and I can’t guarantee that his next owner wouldn’t decide to breed him anyway, so he’s my problem.
Might eventually sell Pancho, just to clear up some space and save some electricity, because three large desert cages for three small animals that are all the same species, sex, and phenotype (Pancho is the only one who might be 100 per cent aqua, but you can’t really tell they all aren’t. Cesar and Nino are both just het, but they’re both extremely blue, and if they’re just pets it doesn’t really mater how many of the offspring that trait would theoretically pass to) is kind of much. (I’ve still got Pancho in the same 50X28X28 that he used to share with Chica and Lupe!) But I think his and Lupe’s kids are here to stay. Meanwhile, Pancho is enjoying summer, Cesar is enjoying life in general without ever really CARING what time of year it is, and Nino is recovering from his last crisis, which was being my first lizard ever to test positive for worms, even though he eats the same exact food as everybody else. It’s just a Nino thing. Anything that CAN happen to him WILL, apparently. Third dose of Panacur is tomorrow.



08/01/11  08:16pm

 #2231997


Reptileruler1
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  Message To: JackAsp   In reference to Message Id: 2231366


  Is a 40 gallon or 55 gallon good for a pair

that sucks same thing happened to me my two females died while brumating but the male made it I’m unsure what happened to the females they were fat and healthy and they all went into brumating together 5 days later I found the 2 females dead so I wish I knew what happened.



08/06/11  07:31pm


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