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 #2155117


Corbinscoots
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 New to collards !!!

im new to collard lizards and was wondering just about the basic stuff like tank size for a breeding pair, temp, and what to eat and how often
and please post pics



06/12/10  06:59am

 #2155426


JackAsp
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  Message To: Corbinscoots   In reference to Message Id: 2155117


 New to collards !!!

At least a 40 breeder. My own experience is that they’re happier in 40 breeders than 55s, because the 55 is so narrow, but if you have room for a 75 (or even bigger) you won’t regret using it.

Night temps aren’t critical, but the cage floor has to get into the upper 80s quickly once the lights click on. People bicker a little about how hot the hot spot needs to be, but don’t be afraid of makng it HOT. Especially in the morning they will often choose areas mjuch warmer than they’re "supposed to," over the more traditional 105 degrees. Seriously, their first basking is usually at 120 degrees or more, and I’ve seen them even use spots in the lower 150s. Mine have two basking platforms, one that’s about 105-108 and one that’s usually about 135 at its hottest point. They eat great, breed every year without hibernating, and have no difficulty whatsoever passing either chiton or sand. I think the hotter option allows them better control, because they can quickly warm up one body part without having to sit there and heat up everything else if they don’t want to.

Their digestive system is similar to a bearded dragon’s, so any low-phosphorus vegies that their willing to eat are great for them, but many of them are pretty solid carnivores, so I find it easier to just gutload their insects. I don’t use water gel for anything. Crickets, mealworms, and superworms are all fed zuchini as their sole moisture source. I also buy small hornworms once a month, which are gutloaded with mulberry paste, and when I see them I buy silkworms, which are fed the same stuff as the hornworms. Sometimes they’ll eat rooaches, sometimes not. Expect crickets to be the bulk of the diet.

I feed the lizards as often as they want. Often they eat every day. If they’re warm and have room to move, they aren’t likely to get obese on a cricket-based diet. With superworms it can happen, though.



06/13/10  02:45pm

 #2155886


Corbinscoots
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  Message To: JackAsp   In reference to Message Id: 2155426


 New to collards !!!

thanks !!



06/15/10  03:26am

 #2156147


JackAsp
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  Message To: Corbinscoots   In reference to Message Id: 2155886


 New to collards !!!

Re-reading that, I realize you could, for all I know, be keeping one in transitional housing, which makes it hard not to overheat the entire cage if using very hot spots. Even in bigger cages, it’s important that they still have lots of space and cages props that stay 90ish or even a little bit lower. You have to play around with not only wattages and distances, but sometimes also chpice of basking naterials themselves. Wood and light ceramic, for example, will get much hotter than a big heavy brick in the same spot would. A great way to cheat is to mix things so you get something on top that gets way, way hotter than the heavier rock that it’s on top of, so they can have a 135 degree spot only a few inches from a 105 degree spot. I still prefer having two spotlights, though. This time of year they aren’t both high-wattage, hell, they aren’t even both UV... but since the UV lights that I DO use are Mercury Vapors, which often overheat and shut themselves off for fifteen minutes, I like to know that there’s still a reasonably hot basking they can shift over to furing that time period. It’s better than nothing!
Mine usually do their morning basking in the hottest area, then hang around on the ground in the upper 80s, often returning to the hottest spot for a "tuneup," then spend the rest of the day alternating between the milder "conventional temp" basking areas and the non-basking perches which I also provide. Picture a high-watt bulb over one end and a medium-watt bulb over the other, with a nice wide piece of driftwood (make sure it’s wide, easy to clean, and horizontal; they aren’t real big on having to actually cling to narrower or more vertical ones, but they love having an elevated runway that they can easily balance on and which doesn’t interfere with ground space or shade the ground too much) runing between them. During the afternooon, if they aren’t basking, extremely gravid, or turning in early for a siesta, they’ll usually be very alert, but very calm, watching everything from atop the central branch area.



06/16/10  12:18am

 #2156171


Corbinscoots
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  Message To: JackAsp   In reference to Message Id: 2156147


 New to collards !!!

umm... thats alot of writing ... lmao



06/16/10  04:12am


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