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 #2177617


DyJohn
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 Our first

So yesterday my husband and 4 year old daughter brought home a (what I am guessing to be very young) gopher snake. He thought it would be funny and I would freak out...Well I didn’t I have always liked snakes and even wanted to own one...so when my daughter asked can I keep it I said that it was fine with me... Now to the point. I have been reading up on snakes and have found many different opinoins on just about everything. We now have the little guy in a 10gal tank with Carefresh bedding, two seperate water dishes, two wooden thingies (yes that is the technical term) for climbing, some plastic greens and a couple of hiding holes. We have a couple of heat lamps one for day one for night, as well as a uv light (we bought a set up from someone second hand). I have already bought some frozen pinkies and plan on trying to feed him in a couple of days after he is settled and used to his new home. Is there anything else that I should be doing? And should I be taking heed to the material that I have read that says "never try to keep a wild snake...they bite...have health problems...wont eat in captivity...and will most certainly die...People who try to keep these wild snakes are just cruel and giving them a slow death"?



09/26/10  06:44pm

 #2177983


Greatballzofire
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  Message To: DyJohn   In reference to Message Id: 2177617


 Our first


A little gopher snake I rescued from a cat. She ate as soon as I got her home. I haven’t had any trouble with getting any wild babies to eat. Of course I start with live pinks since I raise my own mice, but ft should work.
I would recommend an under tank heater controlled by a thermostat for creating a hot spot in your snake’s hide place. These are temperate climate snakes so they don’t need to be kept much over 75 F except for the hot spot, which should be about 85 or 90 F. Put a thermometer exactly where the UTH and thermostat probe is to get an accurate reading. The hot spot is for digestion. These snakes are active and will need a large habitat.


25 months old and still growing! LOL!
(Not a wild caught, but a good example of size none the less)

If you decide not to keep it you will have to go back to the exact location you found it and release it. But if you keep it it will live a long and happy life with no predators and plenty of food. These snakes don’t like to be handled a lot, but when you do handle it, let it travel from hand to hand. It wont generally want to coil around your arm like a python will. (The big fatty above is the exception to that rule! LOL!)



09/28/10  11:17am

 #2178212


DyJohn
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  Message To: Greatballzofire   In reference to Message Id: 2177983


 Our first

Your snakes are beautiful and thanks for the encouragement. Jasper - our little guy is considerably smaller than the smaller of your two...from what info I can gather he is just a hatchling and in this part of washington they usually appear around mid August to September so at the most he is a couple of months old. I am very excited about him, he is quite sweet and let me handle him without any fuss or should I say hiss yesterday. I still haven’t tried to feed him, I have been told to wait until he goes searching for food, but I am thinking that I will try tomorrow either way. I want him to be a fat and happy snake...I know it may be awhile, but I am keeping my eyes peeled for a 30+ gal tank so we can upgrade him as soon as needed...it may take a while like I said he is very small. He fits into the palm of my hand with more than enough room to spare. My husband actually found him in an discarded shotgun shell...he was wedged in there tight, but in there none the less. Thanks again for your response I will see if I can get some pictures of Jasper on here...I think he is perfect, but then he is my new baby what can I say...



09/29/10  03:14pm

 #2178236


Greatballzofire
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  Message To: DyJohn   In reference to Message Id: 2178212


 Our first

He must be very small to fit into a discarded shotgun shell! LOL!
Here is my big girl as a baby right after eating:


They grow fast!



09/29/10  06:22pm

 #2178358


Imderrickjed
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  Message To: Greatballzofire   In reference to Message Id: 2178236


 Our first

I always have wild animals and snakes. So far ive had no problem with health issues or eating. All of our snakes get along together and with us as well. Wild or not if they are hungry they will eat.



09/30/10  12:11pm

 #2178529


DyJohn
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  Message To: Imderrickjed   In reference to Message Id: 2178358


 Our first

Thanks for that I was just going to ask about the eating...we have had him for almost a week and I have tried to feed him twice and he has yet to show interest in the FT pinkies. I even poked the pinky in the head with a needle and still nothing...Should I worry....should I look for live pinkies to start with? And if so where would I find those? My husband has mentioned that we may start breeding our own mice to cut back on the cost of feeding him, but for a quick fix right now I am not sure what would be best. Maybe I am over reacting and he will be fine...but I want to take good care of him. At what point should I start to really be concerned that he is not eating? Thanks for helping out a newbie like me, I REALLY do appreciate it more than you know.



10/01/10  12:22pm

 #2178960


Greatballzofire
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  Message To: DyJohn   In reference to Message Id: 2178529


 Our first

Baby snakes generally want to eat. If the husbandry needs are met and he is not overly stressed, he should want to eat about once a week. You can put the food under his hide so he can get it without having to break cover, in case he is a shy one. Don’t pester him too much. Try once a week. Its useful to have a gram scale to weigh the babies so you can monitor their weight. At this time of year if he does not want to eat and is of good weight, you can brumate him for the winter, and in the spring he will have a vigorous appetite.



10/04/10  10:53am


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