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 #2283300


Lizard girl 4
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 Please help! Sick or injured bird!

This morning my sister saw a little bird fall out of a tree and roll down a hill. She went and picked him up and brought him inside because he couldn’t walk without toppling over and couldn’t get off the ground at all to fly. We have never had pet birds. We are keeping him in a butterfly house (I know, but it is all we have!) We have been giving him water out of a dropper and whenever we do, he reaches out to drink from it. We have flax seed which we tried feeding him but he wouldn’t eat any. I can’t figure out what kind he is. He looks a lot like a Nashville Warbler but he has grey in between his yellow throat and belly. He has the white rim around his eyes. What should we try feeding it? Do you have any suggestions on what to do? He is very alert and is always looking around. Any help would be great! Thanks!



10/19/12  11:00pm

 #2283334


Lizard girl 4
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  Message To: Lizard girl 4   In reference to Message Id: 2283300


 Please help! Sick or injured bird!

He doesn’t have a yellow belly like I thought. He is a yellow rumped Warbler. Do they eat insects? I am going to do research on them right after I post this. This morning he is doing fine and is still perky.



10/20/12  10:34am

 #2283636


The Lone Glider
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  Message To: Lizard girl 4   In reference to Message Id: 2283334


 Please help! Sick or injured bird!

Never had one, But from my understanding this is their feeding and some more on them. Most wild birds eat a large verity of insects.. I hope this helps and I’m, sorry it’s a late posting-These birds one of North America’s most abundant neotropical migrants. They are primarily insectivorous. The species is perhaps the most versatile foragers of all warblers. Beyond gleaning from leaves like other New World warblers, they often flit, flycatcher-like, out from their perches in short loops, to catch flying insects. Other places Yellow-rumped Warblers have been spotted foraging include picking at insects on washed-up seaweed at the beach, skimming insects from the surface of rivers and the ocean, picking them out of spiderwebs, and grabbing them off piles of manure. Common foods include caterpillars and other larvae, leaf beetles, bark beetles, weevils, ants, scale insects, aphids, grasshoppers, caddisflies, craneflies, and gnats, as well as spiders. They also eat spruce budworm, a serious forest pest, during outbreaks.[2]

When bugs are scarce, the Myrtle Warbler also enjoys eating fruit, and the wax-myrtle berries which gave it its name. It is the only warbler able to digest such waxy material. The ability to use these fruits allows it to winter farther north than other warblers, sometimes as far north as Newfoundland. Other commonly eaten fruits include juniper berries, poison ivy, poison oak, greenbrier, grapes, Virginia creeper and dogwood. They eat wild seeds such as from beach grasses and goldenrod, and they may come to feeders, where they’ll take sunflower seeds, raisins, peanut butter, and suet. On their wintering grounds in Mexico they’ve been seen sipping the sweet honeydew liquid excreted by aphids. Male Yellow-rumped Warblers typically tend to forage higher in the trees than females do. While foraging with other warbler species, they sometimes aggressively displace other species, including Pine Warblers and Blackburnian Warblers.[2]

They nest in coniferous and mixed woodlands, and lay 4–5 eggs. Females build the nest, sometimes using material the male carries to her. The nest is a cup of twigs, pine needles, grasses, and rootlets. She may also use moose, horse, and deer hair, moss, and lichens. She lines this cup with fine hair and feathers, sometimes woven into the nest in such a way that they curl up and over the eggs. The nest takes about 10 days to build. Nests are located on the horizontal branch of a conifer, anywhere from 1.2 to 15 m (3.9 to 49 ft) high. Tree species include hemlock, spruce, white cedar, pine, Douglas-fir, and larch or tamarack. They may build their nests far out on a main branch or tuck it close to the trunk in a secure fork of two or more branches. Occasionally nest are built in a deciduous tree such as a maple, oak or birch. The eggs are incubated for 12 to 13 days. Nestlings are helpless and naked at hatching but grow quickly. The young are brooded for 10 to 14 days, at which point they can fledge.
Is he doing okay? I hope he is still doing good..



10/23/12  07:16pm

 #2283669


Lizard girl 4
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  Message To: The Lone Glider   In reference to Message Id: 2283636


 Please help! Sick or injured bird!

It passed away the afternoon I posted that Sorry I forgot to post. We think it might have been sick because it just fell out of the tree. Thank you for all your info though!!



10/23/12  10:13pm

 #2283683


The Lone Glider
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  Message To: Lizard girl 4   In reference to Message Id: 2283669


 Please help! Sick or injured bird!

I’m sorry it passed.I know what that is like. I do work for my conservation department, and that has happened a few times. Just remember you did all you could. you should be proud of that. and now you know what to do next time.



10/24/12  01:18am


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