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Dalebert36   Jasminerae182   SonicBlu  

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 #2319135


Dalebert36
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 New to the Dragon parenthood, could use advise.

I got my beardie as a juvenile about a week ago, as of now he’s in a 10 gallon tank (which I will be upgrading to a 30 at the soonest possible chance I get) he’s eating mostly crickets and meal worms, I have a calcium dust for both (not sure if D3 or not). He’s got two lights as of now, a baking light and a UVB light. Since his home is so small for now he only hashows a small half a log to sit on and hide under, a flat(ish) rock to bask, and his water dish. The substrate is a calcium sand that was recommended at petco when I bought him. He has also just finished a full body shed, which I was told means he is adjusting well? I also can’t seem to get him to eat any vegetation, all I have been trying to give him is some ripped up kale and parsley but he doesn’t seem to take to it. Any advise and input is greatly appreciated :)



07/17/16  11:09am

 #2319152


Jasminerae182
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  Message To: Dalebert36   In reference to Message Id: 2319135


 New to the Dragon parenthood, could use advise.

if you aren’t you should be feeding it small crickets( bigger as the bearded dragon grows) and meal worms, and for veggies the like romaine lettuce, but not iceberg lettuce it can be unhealthy for them. mine is a few months old and is in a 10 gallon tank also, for the light you should have a schedule, for mine i turn it on at 10 pm and off at 10 am, i keep it on overnight instead of the daytime because it gets colder at night, also mine has a stone log that is perched up on the end of the tank, they like to have something to climb and play and sleep on, it also puts them closer to the light. i hope this helps!



07/20/16  10:48pm

 #2319457


SonicBlu
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  Message To: Dalebert36   In reference to Message Id: 2319135


 New to the Dragon parenthood, could use advise.

Jasmine has some very good points there, but let me add more to your queries.

I would invest in at least a 40-gallon tank before they reach a full year old. They will need the extra room because they do tend to get rowdy at times.

Secondly, I would replace that calcium sand with a better substrate simply because bearded dragons (especially juveniles and babies) will ingest a lot of the sand, and since sand (or anything gritty as well as stems, seeds, or anything stringy) does not get digested, too much of any of these things in their system will cause impaction and will make your bearded dragon very sick and unable to produce excrement. Instead of sand, I use shelf liner, which is easy on their claws, not harmful to the bearded dragon, easy to keep clean, and easy to replace when you scrub out their terrarium. A big roll of mesh shelf liner will last you a good long while, and you can find them in rolls at Wal Mart.

All bearded dragons shed, whether they have adjusted well to their surroundings or not. Shedding is mainly a sign of growth. When the bearded dragon is in its shedding periods, it’s best to keep them misted more often than you would normally. Usually 2 to 3 times a week is normal for misting, but during sheddings, every other day until their shedding cycle is complete would be sufficient. The moisture will help the scales come off their bodies easier and it’ll be less irritating to the dragon.

If he doesn’t eat the kale (don’t give them parsley), try a different type of greens. Bearded dragons can eat collard greens, mustard greens, turnip greens, dandelion greens, bok choy, romaine lettuce, and red leaf lettuce. Try not to rely on the latter of the two, since they don’t contain as many vitamins, nutrients, or calcium than the prior greens, but they can eat them and not get sick. Also, never feed them anything that is larger than the space between their eyes. Another item you may want to invest in is made by Zoo Med called Omnivore Mix, which is a bag of freeze-dried foods that bearded dragons love. They get the meats from the silkworms and the nutrients and vitamins from the carrots, peas, and pieces of bok choy. I also want to say if you give your juvenile bearded dragon live foods, best not to get them too many mealworms. Although they’re small enough for juvie beardies to eat, they are mostly exoskeleton and very little meats, which also means very little nutrients and fats. Give them waxworms to start out. They’re softer, more enriched with vitamins, and healthier for the dragon than mealworms. If it appears that they’re not eating on their own, you may need to feed them by hand to get them to understand that these things are food. If they won’t eat from your hand, do the next best thing and place your bearded dragon in front of the food dish when you put a fresh serving into their terrariums. If they still don’t eat, you may need to consider feeding them through a syringe. You can find them online, some pet stores may carry feeding syringes, and also check your local veterinarian, make sure they specialize in exotic pets.

Any further questions, feel free to ask.



09/09/16  11:01am


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