Your Reptile and Amphibian Resource and Information Site

Anoles Forum

Click Here To Register and Become A Member Of The RepticZone Family  

Back to Anoles Forum   Forums   Home   Members Area  

BioAddict   Abreul   BioAddict   AmbuBadger   BioAddict   AmbuBadger  

 Member  Message

 #2321438


BioAddict
View Profile





 Possible Internal Parasite or Genetic Defect in Wild A. Sagrei

I came across this wild male A. sagrei about two years ago. With the numerous A. sagrei I have seen in my area, I have never seen a wild anole look this emaciated. The individual was lacking significant muscle and fatty tissue on the body. The rib cage was protruding abnormally, and when in the light, the anole appeared translucent (in that I could see the skeletal structure and internal organs). His spine was a well-defined physical feature. I watched him for a couple weeks until he disappeared. In those weeks, I noticed that he was eating, and appeared to have normal metabolic function (moving around, basking). With his disappearance, I am assuming he passed on either succumbing to the illness or falling to predation as there did not appear to be a reason to leave his territory (i.e. no competing males, no scarce resources). No other anole in the area had this sickly appearance.
I was wondering if anyone has come across this phenomenon before or if this is a unique individual case. I have a feeling it may have been internal parasites or perhaps an organ disease, but this may have been a genetic defect that he was enduring since hatching. The whole appearance was very odd, indeed. My only regret was not catching him to examine him further.

I have added a link outlining 3 pictures of him. I apologize in advance for the blurriness:
Link
Thank you for reading and any input.



11/01/17  09:20am

 #2321440


Abreul
View Profile



  Message To: BioAddict   In reference to Message Id: 2321438


 Possible Internal Parasite or Genetic Defect in Wild A. Sagrei

Wow, that dorsal view is rather jarring. If you look at the bone structure of a brown anole (Anolis sagrei), it looks rather similar to the picture you’ve shared. So I don’t think his ribs are jutting out; however, like you’ve mentioned, he has nearly zero percent body fat, which may explain the odd shape. I’m guessing that he isn’t able to metabolize/digest his food properly. I recently had a green anole--he passed away recently--that was almost as emaciated, but he did not eat due to a necrotic leg. But the picture shows him eating...hm, very interesting case. :D Thank you so much for sharing!



11/01/17  10:03am

 #2321442


BioAddict
View Profile



  Message To: Abreul   In reference to Message Id: 2321440


 Possible Internal Parasite or Genetic Defect in Wild A. Sagrei

Thank you for your reply and insight. I am sorry about the outcome of your green anole.

I agree with you on the metabolic function; something definitely was not right. In my original post, I meant to put that he had normal response rate to human threat, instead of appearing to have normal metabolic function (which he did not have). I remember him being fairly active/alert, and would aggressively head bob as I approached, then quickly jump onto another platform. He moved around normally and would bask when the temperature were adequate. He may have been dehydrated as well, but I don’t remember the area being too dry during that time (October 2015, Florida). In fact, I remember we had a couple showers during that time, where he would have had access to puddles and droplets. Even so, something was just not functioning properly and I feel as though there was an underlying issue from all of this (disease,parasite, genetic defect, etc) that I have not seen in a wild anole individual / population before.




11/01/17  10:43am

 #2321444


AmbuBadger
View Profile



  Message To: BioAddict   In reference to Message Id: 2321442


 Possible Internal Parasite or Genetic Defect in Wild A. Sagrei

Aloha from a Hawaii and thanks for posting! We have a very well-establish population of A. sagrei here, and I’ve seen many color variations of the species. Your guy looks like some of the paler ones I’ve seen, albeit not too frequently. I assume their lighter color puts them at higher risk for predation by birds and cats. His pelvic area and hind legs appear fine for his size, but his chest does look unusual. I’ve seen a female green anole look like that, and she was an emaciated juvenile I found in the wild and took in to rehab. She has since recovered (the thread titled “Caring for an emaciated anole” has the details), but always had that same barrel-chested appearance as your brown anole presented with. I always assumed that the deformity was due to a lack of nutrients early on in life that lead to her altered bone structure, and that many anoles wouldn’t survive past that point in the wild to be a more frequent occurrence. The fact your anole was very alert and aware of his surroundings tells me that he was neurologically very well— mental status is one of the first things I see decrease when an anole is sick, so I’m guessing he didn’t have any chronic illness or parasite, or at least not to the point where it was impacting his health much. I hope your guy shows up again, they’re apt to warming up to people who offer food! At my old station, they’d come out when we did the yard work and wait for us to clear the dead leaves, exposing the bugs hiding beneath! Smart and aggressive, those brown anoles!



11/01/17  12:14pm

 #2321445


BioAddict
View Profile



  Message To: AmbuBadger   In reference to Message Id: 2321444


 Possible Internal Parasite or Genetic Defect in Wild A. Sagrei

Thank you for your response, I sincerely appreciate it!

A. sagrei have several color variations in my area. I have seen a fair mix of red and even yellow morphs, with the darker and lighter brown/beige morphs conceivably appearing much more commonly (natural / wild type alleles). The diamond and line designs on the spine are even more interesting when you compare them to one another. It’s possible he faced predation, as you mentioned. This particular individual was probably a more favored target due to his color and possible illness. I would love to see more green anoles in the area, but most were driven out by brown / Cuban anoles through competitive exclusion/lack of resource partitioning. I have only one male green anole that is successfully defending his territory on a crepe myrtle, but unfortunately, will not be able to produce offspring being the only green anole in the territory.

I read the post you made and that green anole’s structure appears very similar to this male brown anole. Thank you for telling me about it, and I am glad for the progress you made with Slim. In hindsight, I wish I could have grabbed him and quarantined him for study, as I have really never seen such emaciation to this extent in the wild. Perhaps then, I could have tried to rehabilitate and see if it truly was an illness or a mutation/deformity that could not be corrected. I wish I could find him again, but my hopes are low especially after the amount of time that has passed. It was probably a nutritional deficiency from the start, like you mentioned, but we will never really know for sure.

It’s really interesting that they wait for food like that, isn’t it? A few years ago, I had a population (approx. 15 brown anoles) on another crepe myrtle that I would feed Surinam roaches by hand. It took about three weeks of dropping the roaches near the shrub and waiting nearby until they could acclimate to my presence. Eventually, I was able to get closer until I was able to feed them by hand. After neglecting to feed that population and after some time has passed, however, I would now have to start the process over again with the new generations which currently resides there. Nonetheless, it was nice while it lasted.

Thank you for sharing and for your helpful input! If I find another similar anole, I will definitely provide an update and look into finding a more concrete cause.



11/01/17  02:45pm

 #2321447


AmbuBadger
View Profile



  Message To: BioAddict   In reference to Message Id: 2321445


 Possible Internal Parasite or Genetic Defect in Wild A. Sagrei

Ah, I’ve certainly seen some pale yellow A. Sagrei and quite a few brown ones with almost a golden stripe down their back or a red head. The patterns on the females are very interesting, even if their presence seems to be at the expense of the previously established skink and green anole populations. My fiancée and I are trying to breed the greens and release them into the wild— nothing too ambitious, we’re starting with my my parents’ yard as well as anole-napping any emaciated or sick ones we find! The greens used to be plentiful around here, but they’re practically a rarity unless you know where to look. I certainly wish I could send you two of my female anoles for your bachelor to entertain, seeing that your green anole situation is much bleaker than mine!

Your brown anoles seem a bit more wary of humans than ours— the ones here are almost defiant! I’ve found that establishing a pattern around shy anoles seems to help: I’ll lay out something that will provide contrast, like a small white towel or a plank of wood, and toss mealworms on that. The anoles seem to catch on quickly that a human + towel = food. Well, fingers crossed that your guy shows up again! I always like to think they found someplace they can call their own that is better than my corner of the planet and they’re happy wherever they are.



11/02/17  01:38am


Back to Anoles Forum   Forums   Home   Members Area